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Full text of "Transactions of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society"






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1951 YEARBOOK 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 



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1951 

FLOWER SHOWS 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
IN HORTICULTURAL HALL 

JANUARY 18 and 19 
Camellia Show 

MARCH 11 to 17 (Mechanics Bldg.) 
Spring Show 

MAY 7 and 8 
Daffodil Show 

MAY 15 and 16 
Tulip Show 

JUNE 14 and 15 
Peonies, Iris and Roses 

AUGUST 16 and 17 
Gladiolus Show 

AUGUST 22 and 23 

Exhibition of the Products 

of Children's Gardens 

OCTOBER 10, 11 and 12 
Harvest Show 

NOVEMBER 1 to 4 
Chrysanthemum Show 

(Dates subject to change) 



1951 YEARBOOK 

of the 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 




ANNUAL REPORTS 
for 

1950 

and a List of Books added to the Library 



FOREWORD • The Committee on Lectures and Publications has the 
honor to present herewith the 28th number of the Society's Yearbook, 
with which are combined the annual reports for the year 1950. 
Boston, Massachusetts, July 1, 1951 R. A. Van Meter, Chairman 







Albert C. Burrage 
Elected a Trustee, May 7, 1951 



CONTENTS 

Board of Government 5 

Committees of the Society 7 

President's Address 9 

Report of the Secretary 12 

Report of Exhibitions Committee 18 

Report on Children's Garden's 21 

Report of Prize Committee 23 

Garden Committee Awards 25 

Report of the Library Committee 27 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1950 29 

Special Medal Awards 31, 34, 35 

Report of the Treasurer 40 

Result of the Balloting 42 

Books Added to the Library '. 43 

Garden Week in Massachusetts 52 

Benevolent Fruit and Flower Mission 54 

Necrology 55 

Honorary Members 56 

Bequests to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 57 



All illustrations for the 1951 Yearbook are the work of Paul Genereux, staff 
photographer of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, with the exception of 
the portraits and the back cover which was photographed by Gottscho-Schleisner. 




The President's Cup is awarded by John S. Ames, President, (cen- 
ter) to Eugene Boerner, Director of Research, Jackson Sc Perkins, 
Newark, New York. Director of Exhibitions, Arno H. Nehrling, 
looks on approvingly 



4 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

President 
JOHN S. AMES 

Vice Presidents 

E1R. GEORGE Q. Cf ARK 
GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 

Trustees 

*John S. Ames Walter Hunnewell ( 1954) 

Ernest Borowski ( 1953 ) Ray M. Koon ( 1953 ) 

Albert C. Burrage ( 1954) *George Lewis, Jr. 

Aubrey B. Butler ( 1952 ) Elmer d Merrill ( 1953 > 
George W. Butterworth (1952) 

*Stedman Buttrick 



*Dr. George O. Clark 



Mrs. William A. Parker 
(1954) 

HaroldS. Ross (1953) 
R. A. Van Meter (1952) 



Mp? John Gifpnfr rrrOTinr.r 

( 1952 ) Mrs. Roger S. Warner ( 1954) 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby ( 1953 ) Oliver Wolcott ( 1952 ) 

Jul kju*i yy^.^^o 

^ ^/ Treasurer // 

STEDMAN buttrick 

Assistant Treasurer 
GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 

Secretary 
ARNO H. NEHRLING 



* Members ex-officio. Dates are those of expiration terms. 





Spring Wall Garden — New England Spring Flower Show 1951 
by Alexander I. Heimlich 




A Modern Garden 



- New England Spring Flower Show 1951 
by Frost & Higgins 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 

For the Year Ending May 1, 1952 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 
DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 



AUBREY B. BUTLER 



Executive Committee 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 

Finance Committee 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

Budget Committee 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 



DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 
GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 



Membership Committee 
RAY M. KOON, Chairman 

GEORGE W. BUTTEKWORTH 



Committee on Exhibitions 

DR. ELMER D. MERRILL, Chairman 

GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 



RAY M. KOON 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 



HAROLD D. STEVENSON 



ALBERT C. BURRAGE 
MRS. S. V. R. CROSBY 



Committee on Prizes 

ERNEST BOROWSKI, Chairman 

THOMAS MILNE, Co-Chairman 

EDMUND MEZITT 

Committee on Library 
DR. ELMER D. MERRILL, Chairman 



JAMES METHVEN 



MRS. SUSAN MCKELVEY 
MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 



Committee on Lectures and Publications 
DR. R. A. VAN METER, Chairman 



AUBREY B. BUTLER 



ERNEST BOROWSKI 
DR. ELMER D. MERRILL 



MRS. JOHN G. COOLIDGE 
ALEXANDER I. HEIMLICH 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



ERNEST HOFTYZER 

Committee on Special Medals 
HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 

Committee on Gardens 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 



GEORGE B. CABOT 



DR. R. A. VAN METER 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 
SETH L. KELSEY 



Committee on Building 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 



GEORGE B. CABOT 



Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 



DANIEL W. O'BRIEN 



MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, Chairman 



MRS. HENRY D. TUDOR 



ERNEST BOROWSKI 
ALBERT C. BURRAGE 



ERNEST BOROWSKI 
MRS. S. V. R. CROSBY 



Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 
RAY M. KOON, Chairman 



Nominating Committee 
HAROLD S. ROSS 



GEORGE B. CABOT 
DR. ELMER D. MERRILL 



RAY M. KOON 
DR. ELMER D. MERRILL 



'^ms&m 




Flower Arrangement by Mrs. George E. Taylor received the great- 
est number of points in the flower arrangement section of the New 
England Spring Flower Show 1951 and was given the John Taylor 
Arms Award 



8 



REPORTS OF OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

Presented at the Annual Meeting, May 7 , 1951 

The annual meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was 
held at Horticultural Hall, Boston, on May 7, 1951, at 3:00 P.M., with the 
President, Mr. John S. Ames, in the chair. He appointed as tellers Mr. 
George Taloumis, Miss Mary Kelly, Mrs. Claire Rochefort and Miss Ann 

White 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the Executive Secretary, read the call for the 
meeting. By vote, the reading of the minutes of the previous annual 
meeting was waived. The following addresses and reports were read: 

The President's Address 

We reached another milestone in the history and the accomplishments of 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Society when we convened for the 123rd 
Annual Meeting in Horticultural Hall. As we look back a century and 
more to the days when Boston was a much smaller community, and as we 
read the accounts of the founding of this Society, we are impressed with 
the inspiration possessed by a dozen amateur gardeners on that snowy 
Winter day in 1829 when they launched this fledgling organization "for 
the advancement of Horticulture." Horticulture in all its phases — to 
encourage the growing of fruits, flowers and vegetables — has ever been 
our aim and purpose. Today that spirit is reflected in the multitude of 
activities which we sponsor. 

To the public at large throughout New England and beyond, our 
Flower Shows, nine in number, provide inspiration, ideas for better 
gardens and untold pleasure for many. To our members, we render many 
services — an information department where questions pertaining to every 
phase of horticulture are answered by personal interview, by telephone 
and by mail. Our monthly magazine HORTICULTURE which reaches 
our members twelve times a year continues to maintain its high standard 
and reputation and is the oldest Horticultural publication in America 
now approaching the fifty year mark. In addition more than 30,000 sub- 
scribers in all parts of the country and Europe read it. Our yearbook sent 
to all members keeps them informed of the progress of the Society and 
informs them of all new books added yearly to our ever growing library. 

Many of our members, I fear, are not aware of the extensiveness of our 
great library which authorities declare is the most complete in the U. S. 
I feel that we house in this great building an outstanding repository of 
horticultural knowledge and that we are keeping abreast of every advance 
in horticultural development. It is accessible to all of our members for use 
and the borrowing privilege is extended. Then too, the general public is 
at liberty to use it for reference purposes. 

Last year we commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of the completion 
of this sturdy and spacious building which I am happy to report is in 



10 THE PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

excellent condition. Our heating system has been reconverted for the use 
of Edison Steam which facilitates housekeeping and general maintenance. 
Painting and general improvements are carried on as funds permit. 

The program of cleaning and repairing our portrait collection is now 
completed. Since we realize that it would be impossible to replace these 
portraits, we have had them appraised for a fine arts insurance policy- 
More than a dozen specialized plant societies together with the Garden 
Club Federation of Massachusetts have easy access to the facilities and 
meeting rooms of the Society — another instance of our service and coop- 
eration with every phase of horticultural activity in the commonwealth. 

The awards which we make annually for outstanding achievement in 
the field of horticulture are coveted by the recipients and the garden 
awards given annually by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society are 
cherished by those accomplished garden enthusiasts who receive them. 

Our lecture series continues to attract wide attention and provides 
great stimulus to our members and their friends. 

It is with regret that we announced that Garden Week in Massachu- 
setts would not be held in 1951 because of uncertain world conditions. 
The present state of unrest makes the maintenance of large gardens a 
serious problem at a time when defense plants absorb available labor. 

Our membership is at an all-time high with 14,614 names on our 
roster as of April 1, 1951. At the present time our staff is taxed to capacity 
in its efforts to serve our members and their constantly increasing requests 
for information, sources of plant material and other garden problems. 

Thirty years ago our Society had 1,001 members and a staff of four 
employees, a secretary, a librarian, a janitor and a bookkeeper. There 
were no typewriters in use at the time and little mechanical equipment. 
Furthermore, members seldom came to the Hall. Today with 14 times 
as many members we have a staff of twenty-nine permanent employees 
and during the Spring Flower Show we find it necessary to employ twenty- 
eight additional people. While the growth of the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society is most gratifying and encouraging, it none the less poses 
a problem to the Trustees. We are facing a new era of expansion which 
will require a larger staff if we are to adequately serve the ever growing 
needs of our increasing membership. This is indeed a challenge and I 
believe the most serious problem now confronting the Trustees. 

The report of our Executive Secretary, Arno H. Nehrling, contains 
many interesting facts and observations on the progress of the Society 
which will give you a broader picture of the amazing number of services 
which we render. At this time I am happy to report that we are in excellent 
financial condition and continue to retain our unrivalled reputation. 

In closing I wish to express my gratitude to the Trustees for their 
splendid cooperation and to the members of our staff for their faithful 
effort and to all who help the Massachusetts Horticultural Society function 
so effectively for the advancement of horticulture. 

John S. Ames, 

President 




A Vista in the Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey G. Whitney, 

Woods Hole. Gold Medal 



11 



Report of the Secretary 

Again it becomes my privilege to present my annual report as Executive 
Secretary of the Society. We have had a very busy as well as an interesting 
year here at Horticultural Hall. There is always something in the way of 
activity going on — a lecture, a meeting or a conference. In fact I know 
of no other horticultural society in the country that works as closely with 
so many separate, specialized, plant societies. There are many days when 
we have four or five meetings going on in the building at the same time. 
I think it was Mr. Farrington, our former secretary, who once told me 
that Horticultural Hall is the greatest garden center in the world. 

That this is true may be shown by a typical one day schedule of events 
taken at random from our date book — 10 A. M. Garden Club Service 
meeting in the small exhibition hall; 2 P. M. Garden Club Federation 
Flower Arrangement Section in the same hall; 2 P. M. Flower Arrange- 
ment Class conducted by Mrs. Teele in the lower hall; 2:30 P. M. Directors 
meeting New England Wild Flower Preservation Society, Trustees Room; 
8 P. M. Meeting Executive Committee Gardeners Sc Florists Club of Boston, 
mezzanine floor. 

As Mr. Ames has stated, the Society continues to grow in numbers as 
well as in the scope of its activities. By the end of the year we hope to 
reach the 15,000 mark. However, if we grow beyond that point, and I hope 
we do, more equipment and additional personnel will be necessary. 

As we add new members and new subscribers, requests for informa- 
tion also increase. Our correspondence at this time of the year is tremen- 
dous. We receive so many letters during this period that we cannot always 
reply as promptly as we would like to. Many of the questions are highly 
specialized and technical in nature. They sometimes require hours of re- 
search. Mr. George Taloumis, in addition to his duties as Associate Editor 
of HORTICULTURE is our garden consultant and takes care of the 
garden questions. He does it so well that in many cases his replies quickly 
bring another barrage of questions. We also answer thousands of questions 
over the telephone. Numerous visitors come to the building for personal 
consultation and advice on their gardening problems. 

During the year we carried on a systematic circulation campaign in 
order to obtain new subscribers for our magazine HORTICULTURE. 
As a result we now have over 42,000 subscribers in all parts of the United 
States as well as in foreign countries. This subscription campaign is being 
continued and we have set 50,000 subscribers as our goal. The fact that 
the cost of paper and printing continues to increase is a matter of con- 
siderable concern. 

There have been changes on the editorial staff of HORTICULTURE. 
In October of last year Mr. William H. Clark, the Editor since 1947, 
resigned effective as of January 1, 1951. Mr. Clark is a splendid writer 
and Editor and the Society was sorry to lose his services. We were fortunate 

12 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 



13 



to secure as his successor Mr. Daniel J. Foley who comes to us with a fine 
horticultural background and a wealth of experience in the publication 
field. He is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts where he special- 
ized in horticulture. While at the University, Mr. Foley received the first 
Margaret F. Motley Scholarship established by the Garden Club Federa- 
tion of Massachusetts. The reports on his work were so favorable that the 
Garden Club Federation awarded this scholarship to him a second time. 
After graduation he was associated with the late J. Horace McFarland, 
President of the J. Horace McFarland Company, a firm specializing in 
horticultural printing. Here Mr. Foley planned and edited some of the 
better seed catalogs printed in this country. He also wrote four books 
while there. The one entitled "Garden Flowers in Color" should be on 
the book shelf of every plant lover. During World War II, Mr. Foley served 
with the Corps of Engineers as land-planner at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. 




Chrysanthemum Display 1950 Autumn Flower Show 
by Mrs. Edwin S. Webster 



14 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

In July of last year we lost through death Mr. James Geehan who had 
served as Advertising Manager for HORTICULTURE for 17 years. 
Horticultural advertising is a very highly developed specialty which made 
his position difficult to fill. The Committee on Publications had a number 
of applications for the position and after due consideration was fortunate 
to secure the services of Mr. William R. Littlefield, a graduate of Boston 
University. Mr. Littlefield has youth and energy and has already made 
many friends in the field. 

Last year we conducted for the second time "Garden Week in Massa- 
chusetts." The project proved to be highly successful financially and in 
every other way. Miss Mary May Binney, Chairman of the Committee, 
gave practically all her time to this work and no chairman has ever worked 
more devotedly on any committee of the Society. For her efforts in bringing 
"Garden Week" to a successful conclusion she was awarded the gold medal 
of the Society by the Board of Trustees. 

Horticultural Hall is in excellent physical condition. With the excep- 
tion of painting the Lecture Hall no major improvements are contem- 
plated. Edison heat which was installed last Summer has proven to be 
most satisfactory. We now have a much cleaner building, which is easier 
to maintain and requires less help. Future improvements include a new 
floor in the lecture hall and pointing the outside of the building. 

Lectures sponsored by the Society have again been well attended 
which proves that this service to our members is very much appreciated. 
Thursday evening, February 15, Dr. Milton Carleton, research director 
for Vaughan's Seed Store of Chicago, Illinois, gave a most informative 
lecture on "New Developments in Horticulture." Dr. Carleton demon- 
strated clearly that horticulture in all its phases is at the threshold of many 
new discoveries. We also sponsored two lectures on mushrooms in coop- 
eration with the Boston Mycological Club. 

Attendance at our Annual Spring lecture series was indeed most 
gratifying. The lecture hall was well filled when Dr. Richard A. Howard 
of Harvard University talked on "Jungle Housekeeping" on April 17. 
This was a timely subject tied in with our present war effort. Dr. Howara 
showed kodachromes of many tropical plants of economic value that could 
be used as food for survivors, especially flyers who might be isolated for 
lengthy periods. The lecture "Easy Crops to Grow" by Prof. Paul Dempsey 
and "Planting the Home Grounds" by Seth Kelsey which followed in suc- 
cessive weeks also attracted a large audience. "Color Through the Seasons" 
by Daniel J. Foley, and "Controlling Bugs and Blights" by Prof. W. D. 
Whitcomb of the University of Massachusetts, May 23 rounded out the 
series. 

The Society again conducted nine flower shows in the course of the 
year. I am pleased to report that we had a successful and satisfactory show 
season. The recent Spring show received many favorable comments and 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 15 

a good many people considered it the finest Spring show that has ever 
been staged by the Society. Never before have so many orchids been shown 
at one time. 

In addition to being kept busy with their routine duties, members of 
our staff have given lectures on gardening and miscellaneous horticultural 
subjects to various groups as their time allowed. Members of the staff, in 
order to keep in touch with what is going on in the horticultural world, 
have attended important meetings in different sections of the country. 
Mr. Foley and Mr. Littlefield attended the New York and Philadelphia 
flower shows. Mr. Littlefield also attended the meeting of the Eastern 
Nurserymen's Association which was held in New York City and the 
American seedsmen's convention in Chicago. Your secretary attended the 
50th Anniversary meeting of the American Nurserymen's Association in 
Washington, D. C. as well as the Detroit Flower Show. 

In the course of the year Miss Dorothy S. Manks, our librarian, revised 
her book list "400 Books for Amateur Gardeners" in pamphlet form. We 
also published a circular on the "Box Method for Obtaining Humus" 
prepared by Stephen Fairbanks for distribution at the Spring Flower 
Show. Our latest publication is a booklet by Albert C. Burrage, Jr. with 
the title, "A Week-end Vegetable Garden." A number of other bulletins 
are in the course of preparation. 

We have been fortunate this past year in having in our library interest- 
ing exhibits of various kinds. The most outstanding was an exhibit of 
lichens collected and mounted by Mr. Vernon Prior of the Christian Sci- 
ence Publishing Society. Some of the specimens looked like precious stones 
and fascinated many of our visitors who came to the library. The exhibit 
of herbs and their uses staged by Mrs. Frances Williams of the Herb 
Society of America also attracted a great deal of attention. 

The Committee on Gardens had a very busy summer. They concen- 
trated their activities on the South Shore and the Cape and visited many 
gardens. They recommended a Gold Medal for the garden of Mr. and 
Mrs. Geoffrey G. Whitney of Woods Hole, a Gold Medal for Mr. and Mrs. 
S. A. Kirkman of Cotuit, a Silver Medal for Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Ross 
of Hingham, as well as to Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Gifford of West Dennis. 
A Bronze Medal was awarded to Dr. and Mrs. Edwin Cohn for their garden 
in Cohasset. The Society is greatly indebted to the members of this Com- 
mittee for the time and effort they give to this project. 

The Committee on Special Medals also made a number of awards 
which met with general favor. The George Robert White Medal of Honor 
was awarded to Mr. William Hertrich, Curator Emeritus of the Huntington 
Botanical Gardens of San Marino, California, primarily for the develop- 
ment of San Marino Ranch into an amazingly beautiful botanic garden. 
The Medal was presented to Mr. Hertrich by Professor Alfred Hottes one 
of our members now residing in La Jolla, California at a luncheon on 



16 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

Saturday, April 7. Professor Hottes informed us that it was a most enjoy- 
able affair and that Mr. Hertrich was deeply touched by the honor be- 
stowed upon him by the Society. 

The Thomas Roland Medal, another important award, went to Mr. 
Jan de Graaff of Gresham, Oregon. Mr. De Graaff's horticultural back- 
ground goes back to 1611 when one of his forebears is recorded as a nurs- 
eryman of renown. Mr. de Graaff is considered one of America's most dis- 
tinguished daffodil authorities and hybridists. Now, with apparent success, 
he has launched one of the biggest lily-growing ventures ever known. His 
first hybrid lily originations have caused a stir in the ranks of commercial 
and private lily growers. The Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal was award- 
ed to Dr. Samuel L. Emsweller, who is, at present, in charge of the Research 
Department of the Bureau of Plant Industry at Beltsville, Maryland. Dr. 
Emsweller is an outstanding horticulturist, recognized in all parts of the 
country by scientists for his contributions to the field of commercial flori- 
culture and the nursery industry. 

The Committee awarded the large Gold Medal of the Society to Mr. 
Thomas C. Desmond of Newburgh, New York. Mr. Desmond is an ama- 
teur horticulturist in private life, an engineer by profession and a dis- 
tinguished member of the New York State Senate. He has found time 
to establish and maintain one of the foremost arboretums in the world, 
in Newburgh, New York. 

The Society's large Gold Medal was also awarded to Mr. Robert G. 
Chamberlain of North Easton, superintendent for our President, Mr. 
John S. Ames, for his unusual abilities and conspicuous success in grow- 
ing rhododendrons and azaleas both outdoors and under glass. 

At this time I would like to mention the splendid cooperation we 
receive from other educational institutions whom we call on from time 
to time for assistance. The members of the staff of the Arnold Arboretum, 
the Waltham Field Station, a branch of the University of Massachusetts, 
the Botany Department of Harvard University, the Gardner Museum 
and the Agricultural Department of Jamaica Plain High School are al- 
ways ready and willing to lend a helping hand. This year marks the 60th 
anniversary of the introduction of school gardening to pupils of the Boston 
Public Schools by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 

From this report you will note that there is always something of inter- 
est going on at Horticultural Hall. We never have a dull moment. It is 
unfortunate that many of our members do not know how we function. 
Frequently a new member informs us that he did not even know Horti- 
cultural Hall existed. When he saw the library he realized how much 
he had been missing. Therefore, it behooves every member of the Society 
to interest garden-minded persons in membership in this organization. 

We are looking to the future with a great deal of interest and antici- 
pation. In June of 1952 the Men's Garden Club of America will hold its 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 



17 



annual Convention in Boston. This is one of the fastest growing organiza- 
tions in the country composed primarily of business men who are inter- 
ested in gardening. Two years ago a branch known as the Boston Men's 
Garden Club was organized here at Horticultural Hall. Mr. E. I. Farring- 
ton was one of the charter members and holds the office of secretary. I 
mention this because the Men's Garden Club of Boston and our Society 
are sponsoring the 1952 Convention. 

In conclusion I would like to express my appreciation for the loyal 
support I have received from the officers and trustees as well as the chair- 
men of the various committees. Finally I wish to express my thanks to the 
members of the staff for their untiring efforts and faithful service. I trust 
that I may enjoy the same loyalty and cooperation in the years ahead. 

Arno H. Nehrling, 

Executive Secretary 




Acacia Garden 1951 New England Spring Flower Show 
by Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

On behalf of the Exhibitions Committee it is my pleasure to report an- 
other successful year. I wish to commend all members of the Committee 
for their faithful attendance at all nine meetings of the group, for their 
devotion to the best interests of the Society, and for their constructive 
suggestions regarding the various exhibitions as they were being planned. 
.1 am sure that all members would wish me to express the committee's 
appreciation of the fine support rendered to the group by all the officials 
of the Society, and also to all the exhibitors for their splendid cooperation. 
We cannot forget for a moment that it is the skill, ability, and deep inter- 
est of the exhibitors that, year after year, enables us to stage outstanding 
flower shows. It is to them that the high standards, characteristic of all 
exhibits sponsored by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, are due. 
At this point I wish to express my personal appreciation to Professor Ray 
Koon, who took over the chairmanship in a most satisfactory manner 
when I was absent last summer, and again more recently at the time of the 
Spring Show when I was absent from the United States. The duties of the 
Committee are such that meetings must be held at intervals throughout 
the year because of continuity in exhibitions and, further, because new 
problems constantly arise which must be dealt with promptly. Meetings 
are called whenever the Show Manager feels the need of the support and 
advice of the group. Sometime, perhaps, in place of the usual dry adminis- 
trative report, some chairman of the group may find time to prepare an 
essay on what is behind a great flower show; for no sooner than does the 
annual Spring Show close than planning for the next year's exhibition 
commences. Successful flower shows simply do not just happen. 

During the year nine exhibitions were staged under the auspices of 
the Committee, all closely supervised by the secretary, Mr. Nehrling, and 
his staff. The eight smaller shows were staged in Horticultural Hall, with a 
total attendance of about 28,000. These, in order of sequence, were the 
Camellia, Daffodil, Tulip, June, Gladiolus, Products of Children's Gar- 
dens, Harvest, and Autumn shows. Admission to all of these is free to 
members of the society, and with the exception of the Autumn show, also 
to the general public as well. The attendance at these shows varied from 
a low of about 2,000 for some of the smaller specialized exhibits, to a high 
of about 7,500 for the Autumn show. As usual the large Spring Show was 
held in the Mechanics Building, the paid attendance being 109,890, about 
10,000 less than in 1950. This decrease was certainly due not to lack of 
interest in the exhibition, but to the fact that one day of show week was 
very stormy. The total attendance at all shows was 137,959. While this is 
somewhat less than that in previous years, it is worthy of note that the 
attendance at all of the eight smaller shows, except one, increased. We 
now take it for granted that there will always be a large attendance at the 
Spring Show, but it is indeed gratifying that the attendance at the smaller 
and mostly specialized shows tends to increase. It is in part through these 
free exhibitions that the Society fulfills some of its obligations to its mem- 
bers, and also, at the same time serves the public; and it is, in part, due 

18 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON EXHIBITIONS 



19 



to the annual profits from the Spring Show that we are able to stage these 
smaller free exhibitions. 

As in previous years our all out effort was, of course, devoted to the 
Spring Show which has become a definitely established feature of the Bos- 
ton season. A prime objective is always to stage a diversified, attractive, 
and at the same time an educational exhibition. The basic plans must 
be changed each year, for naturally we cannot feature the same major 
theme year after year without being subject to deserved criticism. This is 
a field where the Exhibitions Committee seeks advice. If any member of 
this group has ideas as to possible themes for future exhibitions or as to 
attractive special features which might be developed, I assure you that 
the Committee will appreciate these, and that it will seriously consider 
all suggestions that may prove to be practicable. Constructive criticism 
is always welcome. 

This year, because the annual meeting of the American Orchid Society 
was held in Boston the very week of our Spring Show, a special cooperative 
arrangement was made with its officials, whereby much more space, than 
is normally the case, was assigned to orchids, and additional classes were 
provided for these attractive plants. As a result this part of the Spring 
Show, due largely to the efforts of Mr. L. Sherman Adams and Mr. George 




Display of House Plants 1951 New England Spring Flower Show 
by Jamaica Plain High School 



20 REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON EXHIBITIONS 

W. Butterworth, was developed into one of the largest, if not the very 
largest orchid show ever staged in the United States. However, because 
space for regular exhibitors was thus reduced, in justice to those who had 
exhibited year after year at the Spring Show, it became essential that addi- 
tional space be developed. The only possibility was the basement floor, 
which normally is little used. The combined extraordinary expenses in- 
volved because of the large space devoted to orchids, plus the expenses 
involved in developing the additional space above referred to, resulted 
in expenditures considerably in excess of the estimated cost of staging the 
Spring Show at the time the budget was prepared and approved. Then 
too, because of the very nature of the case, it became necessary, in the 
interests of harmony and understanding, to modify certain standard regu- 
lations and policies. The net result was that the over all cost of the Spring 
Show was considerably in excess of that of the past few years. However 
this was not wholly due to the factors above mentioned, for everything 
that went into the show cost from about ten per cent to as much as 
twenty-five per cent more than in 1950. 

The net profit to the Society, in spite of increased expenses and a re- 
duced attendance, was approximately $30,000.00, or about $10,000.00 
less than we anticipated when the 1951 budget was prepared and approved. 
As mentioned in previous reports the Trustees of the Society depend on 
the profits from the Spring Show to help in the general support of various 
activities of the Society outside of the exhibitions field. In recent years 
the profits from the Spring Show have approximated one-third of the cost 
of operating the Society. Because of the combination of circumstances 
mentioned above, increased costs, decreased income due to one stormy 
day which radically reduced the attendance, we failed to equal the records 
of the past few years; yet because of increased income in other fields, the 
approved budget will be met by the total income of the organization as a 
whole. We are convinced, however, from this experience, that in planning 
for future spring shows a determined effort must be made to reduce ex- 
penses. There is, however, a limit beyond which we cannot go, for it is 
most essential that the high standards of exhibits demanded by the Society 
be maintained. As has been noted in previous reports, we are indeed 
fortunate that under our local, very wise organization, the Society is solely 
responsible for the Spring Show. All profits accrue to it, rather, as is the 
case in some other centers, the profits being divided between several organi- 
zations. 

All exhibitions of the Society speak for themselves. I would like, at 
this time, to mention some of the special features of various exhibits at 
the Spring Show and at some of the smaller exhibitions, but space forbids. 
I do, however, again wish to express the sincere appreciation of all mem- 
bers of the Exhibitions Committee, as well as that of the officials of the 
Society, for the unselfish services of all who have cooperated to make the 
activities of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society the success that it has 
been for the preceding year. All members have every reason to be pleased 
at the manner in which the affairs of the Society are handled. 

E. D. Merrill, Chairman 

Committee on Exhibitions 



Report of the Committee on Children 's Gardens 

The 1950 Children's Show was the second one under the direction of the 
new Chairman of the Committee on Children's Gardens, Mrs. Roger S. 
Warner. There were 1,142 entries in the Home and School Garden sec- 
tion and 482 entries in the 4-H Club section, making a total of 1,624 
entries. This was 89 entries more than the great Show of 1945 during the 
Victory Garden era when everyone had a garden. The drought of 1950' 
in the Metropolitan Boston area apparently had no effect on the Show. 

The individual vegetable classes had many entries. Notable among 
these was the class for six specimens of beets, which had 74 entries by 
actual count; six specimens of ripe tomatoes had 56 entries. The class for 
six specimens of green tomatoes reached an all time high for any class 
with 92 individual entries. Flower classes were also well filled with 29 
entries m the class for mixed bouquets. 

The quality of the vegetables was extremely high for a Children's 
Show, and the judges had a difficult job on their hands to pick the first 
prize plate or exhibit in many classes. As proof of this, let me report that 
the group of judges assigned the school garden exhibits and the class of 
educational exhibits required about four hours to judge five classes. 

The large school garden on the Cummings Estate in Woburn, operated 
by the Boston School Department in cooperation with the Park Depart- 
ment, as usual, had a large and very well staged display, as well as many 
individual entries. The large display was of such high quality that the 
judges not only awarded it first prize in its class but also the silver medal 
of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society for the third successive year. 
Mrs. Henry D. Tudor, a member of the Children's Show Committee who 
has a particular interest in the children who participate in this project, 
has donated $300.00 as a fund for the purchase of milk for the children 
attending this garden through the Summer season of 1951. At present the 
Park Department is supervising the erection of an excellent permanent 
Field House with proper sanitary facilities for both children and staff and 
allowance for proper storage of tools and products grown. A large recrea- 
tion room will provide protection for the children in case of sudden showers. 

The Massachusetts State Department of Agriculture awarded the Win- 
ship School Garden a fine rosette ribbon for outstanding quality. 

Attendance at the Show was much greater in 1950. At the close of the 
Show, the children presented the produce to the Fruit and Flower Mission. 

The 4-H Club Exhibit in the upper hall, under the direction of Mr. 
Earle H. Nodine, Assistant State Club Leader, filled the hall. It was of 
high quality and a credit to everyone connected with that department. 

I wish to take this opportunity to thank the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society for its interest and genuine cooperation in the School Garden 
movement. I especially appreciate the enthusiasm of Secretary Nehrling 
and the assistance given by Mr. Jackson and his staff at Horticultural Hall. 
The entire personnel of the Society's office has always been of great assist- 
ance and very patient in working with the children at this Show. 

Daniel W. O'Brien, 

The Committee on Children's Gardens 

21 



■'■■■■■"■■■.■■■■■■■.■'■: ■■: : ::^'^v-^:i:-:: 




Model Tool Shed 1951 New England Spring Flower Show by the 
Lowell Garden Club staged under the direction of the Women's 
Exhibitions Committee 




Outdoor Living Room 1951 New England Spring Flower Show 
by Lexington Nurseries, Inc. 

22 



Report of the Committee on Prizes 

When I accepted this position as Chairman of the Committee on Prizes, 
I was filled with fear and trembling. Well I knew that the path that lay 
ahead would be rugged. When I mentioned my doubts to Mr. Nehrling, 
he said to me "you can do it, and remember this — Mr. Ames would never 
have offered you this opportunity to serve if he had thought you were un- 
worthy." With this in mind, and knowing that the confidence, support 
and sympathetic understanding of these men could always be relied upon, 
I could not fail. And so it has been. When called upon to judge the bee 
keeper's exhibit, I protested because I knew nothing about bees; the 
answer came, "you can do it — and do not forget the mushroom exhibit 
and the women's hats." Here is something one would like to forget, for 
after all what does a mere man know about women's hats. "You can do it." 

I would like to report an interesting and busy year as Chairman of the 
Committee on Prizes. The Committee realizes full well its responsibility 
to the Society and to the Exhibitors. At all times this Committee has kept 
in mind the importance of judging all exhibits impartially without fear or 
favor. I cannot stress too much the importance for both judges and ex- 
hibitors to follow the course of procedure given in the Rule Book of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

All important exhibits were judged by scales of points which eliminates 
many controversies. Any exhibitor may see his score as these records are 
available. 

Our Committee held five meetings in the course of the year, and 
judged at all nine of the exhibitions held by the Society. At all shows the 
Committe judged all special exhibits and did all the judging at the smaller 
shows as well. 

The Society is constantly trying to obtain new judges. In many cases 
we need judges who are familiar with certain types of flowers such as 
roses, carnations, chrysanthemums and orchids. We also need the names 
of more judges who are qualified to judge fruits, vegetables, flower ar- 
rangements, garden exhibits and cut flower displays. If any of you are 
interested in this type of work and feel you have the necessary qualifica- 
tions, please send your application either to the Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Prizes or to the Secretary of the Society. Do this at your earliest 
possible convenience as it is the desire of the Committee to revise its card 
index of judges in the near future. 

I would like to express my gratitude to the officers and personnel of 
the Society for their friendly cooperation, to the judges who gave so 
freely of their time and to the members of this Committee who worked 
so efficiently and unselfishly during this year. 

Ernest Borowski, Chairman 
Thomas Milne, Co-Chairman 

Committee on Prizes 

23 




Planting — The Driveway of Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Kirkman, Cotuit 

Gold Medal 



24 



GARDEN COMMITTEE AWARDS 

The Board of Trustees awarded the following medals on the recom- 
mendation of the Committee on Gardens, Seth L. Kelsey, chairman. 

The Society's Gold Medal. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey G. Whitney of Woods Hole, for an outstand- 
ing, sea-side estate of unusual charm combining excellent architectural 
detail with exceptional plant material. Specimen Yews, English Holly and 
other fine plants serve as a background for gardens in different areas for 
roses, perennials, vegetables and alpine plants. Unusual plants lend in- 
terest without detracting from the overall effect of neatness and livability. 

The Society's Gold Medal: 

To Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Kirkman, for a hill-top estate in Cotuit, where 
fine trees and spacious lawns create an atmosphere of restful quiet. Over- 
looking the sea, full use is made of every view, while more intimate effects 
are found in the paths which wind down the hillside through native 
undergrowth to the shore. Good design and careful maintenance result 
in landscape effects of great appeal. 

The Society's Silver Medal. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Ross for a fine garden in Hingham. On a 
steep hillside, in a limited area are found plants of wide variety reflecting 
the horticultural interest and energy of the owners. Dogwood, azalea, 
mountain laurel and many other fine species clothe the hillside along with 
smaller plants and ground covers. Everywhere a high degree of cultural 
excellence is noted, especially in the test gardens for roses, tulips, daffodils, 
and other special groups. 

The Society's Silver Medal: 

To Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Gifford, for a small garden in West Dennis 
where simplicity and good taste have created an overall effect of exquisite 
charm. From the tiny door^ard garden to the ancient trumpetcreeper over 
the barn, and the path down the rear slope to the Japanese iris at the 
water's edge, every detail is well-planned and effective. 

The Society's Bronze Medal. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Edwin Cohn, for their garden in Cohasset. Full 
advantage is taken of glimpses of the ocean framed by rugged native 
junipers. Granite ledged and rolling lawns give a variety of views in 
different areas, while a tiny herb garden adds a note of interest. 

25 





A Glimpse of the Hillside Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. 
Ross, Hingham 

Silver Medal 




A Fruit and Herb Garden of Dr. and Mrs. Edwin Cohn, Cohasset 

Bronze Medal 



When the 1951 Yearbook went to press there were no available 
photographs of the garden of Mr. and Mrs. Albert L. Gifford of 
West Dennis which was awarded a Bronze Medal. 



26 



Report of the Library Committee 

The library continues to be a most important unit in the activities of the 
Society, and eminently deserves the support which the organization has 
fortunately been in a position to provide. Its activities tend to increase 
each year, as well as do the demands upon its staff for special services. I 
remind you that it is by far the largest and most important horticultural 
library in the United States, but to retain its position its staff must con- 
tinuously be on the alert. The reading room is constantly a center of 
activity, with its numerous readers, visitors, and its special exhibits. The 
library unit has developed into a most important center of general in- 
formation on matters horticultural and in cognate fields. To provide the 
answers to all queries received, and to assist readers in locating the special 
publications they need takes much time; but, after all, this is time well 
spent for the benefit of the Society, its members, and the special clientele 
it serves. 

The total number of bound volumes on its shelves is now 30,518. 
During the year ending December 31 there were added 351 books supple- 
mented by 145 bound volumes of periodicals, an average year's acquisitions. 
The actual use of the library by readers and by members is indicated by 
the circulation figures. During the past year 5,647 volumes were loaned — 
the largest number in the entire history of the Society. From January 1 
to April 24* of this year, the number loaned was 2,257. If this rate is main- 
tained, the circulation figures for 1951 will exceed those of 1950. Loans 
to out of town members involved the sending of 1,763 packages to ad- 
dresses in 37 states in 1950; the number of packages sent since January 1 
of this year is 764. Those who may scan this report are reminded that all 
members of the Society are permitted to borrow books, but this privilege 
is not extended to the general public. This is one of the rewards of mem- 
bership in the Society. That the privilege is appreciated is evidenced by 
the extraordinary figure of more than 2,500 packages of books mailed, as 
loans to members, in the majority of the states of the Union. Borrowers 
reimburse the library for the cost of transportation on books. 

I assure you that the library is indeed a very busy place, for in addition 
to the daily problems which must be met, special exhibits are maintained 
in the reading room for the benefit of visitors, and these are changed at 
appropriate intervals. 

The project of recataloging the library is still with us, and has, at 
times, been delayed by illness on the part of staff members. With 1,580 
volumes recatalogued in 1950, the monthly average was maintained; and 
562 volumes were handled since January 1, 1951. The balance to be taken 
care of in individual books is about 2,500; in addition there are about 
3,500 sets of periodicals, but we are assured that work on these will pro- 
ceed much more rapidly than has been the case with individual books. As 
previously noted, as long as work on this project had been initiated some 
years ago, and was well advanced, it was clear that it should be finished; 
apparently, it will be a matter to be mentioned for several years to come. 

27 



28 REPORT OF THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

The outline of the new classification system was finished, mimeo- 
graphed, and distributed, during the year, to interested individuals as well 
as to about 100 special libraries — those either restricted to or strong in 
horticultural literature. It is not claimed to be perfect, for in this field 
perfection is relative; but it has been found to be very practicable. One 
can find one's way from one subject to another on the shelves, and there 
is room for growth at any point as future needs develop. 

A new estimate of the value of the library for insurance purposes was 
made, the total arrived at being $150,500.00. Like other older and special- 
ized libraries, where high values are involved for certain individual vol- 
umes, the amount is undoubtedly a very conservative estimate. In the 
field of early printed books our library is rich; the unit prices demanded 
for such volumes increases very sharply. In many cases special items al- 
most never are offered by dealers, and yet the demand for them is con- 
stant. However, the number of volumes of an individual rare work re- 
quired to fill immediate demands is not sufficiently great to warrant offset 
reproductions. These are the items that are in demand by the research 
worker, and for him they are, in many cases, a must. Naturally, with refer- 
ence to the loan privileges extended to members of the Society, these 
old, rare, and now high priced volumes are on the reserved list and may 
be consulted only in the library. 

It has not been necessary to call many meetings of the Library Com- 
mittee during the year — an indication that the library affairs are in good 
hands. Through data distributed from time to time by the librarian the 
individual members have been kept informed as to significant develop 
ments. 

E. D. Merrill, Chairman, 

Committee on the Library 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1950 
The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for the most outstanding exhibit 
in 1950. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

William Hertrich, San Marino, California, for eminent service in horticul- 
ture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Jan de Graaff, Gresham, Oregon, for progressive cultural practices and 
hybridization of superior daffodils and lilies. 

Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal 

Dr. Samuel L. Emsweller, Research Department, of the Bureau of Plant 
Industry, Beltsville, Maryland, for his able research and valuable con- 
tributions to horticulture. 



Gold Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Miss Mary May Binney, Milton, in grateful appreciation for pioneering 
Garden Week in Massachusetts — 1949 and 1950. 

Robert G. Chamberlain, North Easton, for his eminent horticultural ac- 
complishments and for his unusual abilities and conspicuous success in 
growing rhododendrons and azaleas, both outdoors and under glass. 

Thomas C Desmond, Newburgh, New York, for establishing an outstand- 
ing private arboretum. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Kirkman, Cotuit, for a hill-top estate, where fine trees 
and spacious lawns create an atmosphere of restful quiet. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey G. Whitney, Woods Hole, for an outstanding sea- 
side estate of unusual charm combining excellent architectural detail 
with exceptional plant material. 

Silver Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Gifford, West Dennis, for a small garden where sim- 
plicity and good taste have created an overall effect of exquisite charm. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Ross, Hingham, for a fine hillside garden with 
interesting test plots of roses, tulips, daffodils and other special groups. 

29 




William Hertrich, San Marino, California 
Awarded the George Robert White Medal of Honor 



30 



Presentation of the George Robert White Medal of 
Honor to William Hertrich* 

In 1915, I journeyed to California for the first time. When I visited the 
Huntington Botanical Gardens and Art Gallery, I felt that it was here 
that I was in true fairyland. It was at that time, 36 years ago, that I came 
to know William Hertrich who was as gracious to me as if I had been an 
eminent horticulturist. For the non-botanist it is almost impossible to real- 
ize how few of the plants that one sees in this California landscape are 
natives. Some one has searched the earth to bring back to our semi-arid 
climate the hundreds, yea thousands, of unusual plants which grace the 
gardens of this paradise. William Hertrich was a pioneer in wondering. 
He wondered whether the vast array of desert treasures would do in his 
gardens. He wondered what he could also grow if he added water and, 
so, today we see the result of his vision. 

Dr. J. Arthur Thomson, in his "Bible of Nature" tells us that there are 
three kinds of men in the world; practical, scientific, and emotional. The 
practical man looks at the world with his hand. He asks how much a tree 
is worth, how much he can sell it for and what his hands can make with 
it. Everything carries a price tag. The scientific man looks at the world 
of nature with his head. He wonders — why the sky is blue, why a plant 
produces a poison whereas its neighbor is a common source of our nourish- 
ment. When a small boy he asked his father so many questions that he 
was reminded that "curiosity killed a cat." "Yes," William no doubt replied, 
"but what was the cat curious about; maybe it was worth dying for." That 
is the scientific attitude. The emotional man looks at his surroundings, 
with his heart. He remarks, "It's wonderful to be alive in this wonderful 
world." But he has no right to use the word "wonderful" because that 
word is for the exclusive use of the scientist. Fortunate is that man who is 
practical enough to make a living because he wishes to interpret the 
rhymes of the universe — practical, scientific, and emotional. Such a man 
is William Hertrich and because of this the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society asks me to say to you: 

William Hertrich, in recognition of your unusual ability as a landscape 
architect and your devotion to the development of the San Marino Ranch 
into this amazingly beautiful Huntington Botanical Gardens, we desire to 
recognize your zealous spirit by presenting our highest award for achieve- 
ment — the George Robert White Medal of Honor. 

You are in distinguished company — the horticulturists of this country 
and Europe are co-recipients of this honor. 

Alfred C. Hottes 



* The Medal was presented to Mr. Hertrich by Alfred C. Hottes, La Jolla, California 
who represented the Massachusetts Horticultural Society at a luncheon sponsored by the 
Trustees of the Huntington Library, San Marino, California, April 7, 1951. 

31 



32 MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1950 

Bronze Medal of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Dr. and Mrs. Edwin Cohn, Cohasset, for an unusual garden by the sea. 

President's Cup 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston, for a group of amaryllis at the 
Spring Show. 

Gold Medal of the 
Horticultural Society of New York 

Alexander I. Heimlich, Woburn, for a ledge garden at the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for an entrance planting of aca- 
cias at the Spring Show. 

George Holliday Memorial Prize 

John Sullivan, Boston, for a group of amaryllis at the Spring Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

Chestnut Hill Garden Club, for the most charming garden club exhibit 
at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 

North Shore Garden Club, for the horticultural excellence of a blue and 
white garden at the Spring Show. 

The Antoine Leuthy Gold Medal 

Fred Walters, Chestnut Hill, for a group of odontoglossums at the Spring 
Show. 

Trophy of the 
Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

Alexander I. Heimlich, Woburn, for a ledge garden at the Spring Show. 

Sarah Todd Bulkley Medal of the 
Garden Club of America 

Bartlett Gardens, Hamilton, for a blacksmith shop and garden at the 
Spi ing Show. 



medals and certificates awarded in 1950 33 
Book: "Gardener's Travel Book" 

Mr. and Mrs. Dana Osgood, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina, for camellia 
Ville de Nantes, best bloom in the Show. 

T. A. Weston Memorial Trophy 

Orchidvale, Beverly Farms, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Crystal Vases 

William McKee, Worcester, for daffodil Krakatoa, best bloom in the Show. 
John L. Russell, Dedham, for tulip Coronado, best bloom in the Show. 

American Orchid Society Award 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill, for the most meritorious 
orchid exhibit at the Spring Show. 

New England Gladiolus Society 
31st Anniversary Prize 

An illuminated scroll awarded by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
to George V. Pearson, Taunton, for gladiolus variety Parthiena. 

Gold Medals 

American Rock Garden Society (New England Regional Unit), for a rock 

garden at the Spring Show. 
Associated Fruit Growers of Eastern Massachusetts, for a display of fruits 

and vegetables. 

Bartlett Gardens, for a blacksmith shop and garden at the Spring Show. 
Bay State Nurseries, Inc., for an informal garden with stone cottage at 
the Spring Show. 

Boston School of Flower Arrangement, Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Director, 

for Holiday decorations. 
Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Breck's, for a display of garden chrysanthemums 
Breck's for a display of daffodils. 
Breck's, for a Spring garden at the Spring Show. 
Breck's, for a display of tulips. 
Butterworth's, for a group of orchids. 

F. I. Carter & Sons, for a garden of cacti and succulents at the Spring Show. 
Champlain View Gardens, Burlington, Vermont, for a display of gladiolus. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for an informal entrance planting at the Spring 

Show. 

(See page 36) 





(far* 




The THOMAS ROLAND MEDAL for skill in horticulture: to Jan de Graaff of 
Gresham, Oregon. Mr. de Graaff's horticultural background and inheritance can 
be traced back to 1611 when one of his forebears was recorded as a nurseryman 
of renown. For nearly 150 years this distinguished family name has been in the 
forefront of the bulb industry in Europe and America. Young Jan is considered 
today America's most distinguished authority and hybridizer in the growing of 
daffodils. In addition, his work with lilies is exciting the commercial and 
amateur horticultural world. 




The Society's GOLD MEDAL: to 
Mr. Thomas C. Desmond, Newburgh, 
New York. A keen amateur horticul- 
turist, Mr. Desmond is an engineer 
by profession and has a record of 
distinguished public service in the 
New York State Senate. In addition 
to assembling an extensive collection 
of native American trees, shrubs and 
woody plants, Senator Desmond has 
also taken a vital interest in exotic 
plants. His enthusiastic and intelli- 
gent approach in planting a great 
arboretum is hereby recognized by 
the Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety. 



34 



The JACKSON DAWSON MEDAL 
for skill in hybridization and propa- 
gation of hardy, woody plants: to Dr. 
Samuel L. Emsweller, Principal Hor- 
ticulturist, Bureau of Plant Industry, 
Beltsville, Maryland. Dr. Emsweller's 
activities have been exceedingly di- 
versified in the field of commercial 
floriculture and the nursery industry. 
Specifically, his work with azaleas 
and other ericaceous plants qualifies 
him with distinction in receiving the 
Jackson Dawson Medal. 




The poard of Trustees have awarded the medals described here on the 
recommendation of the Special Medals Committee, Harold S. Ross, chair- 
man.See also page 31 for the GEORGE ROBERT WHITE MEDAL 
OF HONOR Award 



The Society's GOLD MEDAL: to 
Mr. R. G. Chamberlain of North 
Easton, superintendent for the Presi- 
dent of the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society, John S. Ames. Over 
the years Mr. Chamberlain has shown 
unusual ability and skill in grow- 
ing rhododendrons and azaleas both 
in the garden and in the greenhouse. 
Furthermore, he has achieved unus- 
ual success in the culture of a wide 
variety of choice plants. 




35 



36 MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1950 

Gold Medals, Continued 
Cherry Hill Nurseries, for the combined displays of peonies. . 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dane, for a group of odontoglossums at the Spring 

Show 
Sherman Eddy, Avon, Connecticut, for an old mill and garden at the 

Spring Show. 
Frost & Higgins Company, for an apothecary's garden and shop at the 

Spring Show 
The Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Co-chairmen, Mrs. Chester 

Cook and Mrs. Samuel B. Kirkwood), for flower arrangements at the 

Spring Show. 
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, for a group of amaryllis at the Spring 

Show. 
Alexander I. Heimlich, for a ledge garden at the Spring Show. 
Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc., for a garden with brick terrace at the Spring Show. 
Lexington Nurseries, Inc., for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Massachusetts Department of Conservation, for an educational conserva- 
tion exhibit at the Spring Show. 
New England Rose Growers, for a display of roses at the Spring Show. 
New York Agricultural Experiment Station, for a display of grapes, apples 

and small fruits 
Orchidvale, for an educational group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Richard C. Paine, for a group of Winter-flowering begonias. 
Richard C. Paine, for a cymbidium garden at the Spring Show. 
The Philadelphia Branch of the National Association of Gardeners (at 

Philadelphia), for a display of chrysanthemums. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for an entrance planting of acacias at the 

Spring Show. 
Waltham Field Station, University of Massachusetts, for a display of tulip 

varieties. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Weston Nurseries, Inc., for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
The Women's Exhibitions Committee of the Massachusetts Horticultural 

Society, (Miss Mary May Binney, Chairman), for "Rainbow Gardens" 

at the Spring Show. 

Silver Medals 

Boston School Garden, Woburn, for the largest and best display of vege- 
tables from a school garden. 
Butler 8c Ullman, Inc., for camellia arrangements. 
Butterworth's, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 
James R. Cass, for a display of lilies. 

Albert A. Hulley, for a collection of hybrid clematis at the Spring Show. 
The Merrys, for a display of chrysanthemums. 
The Merrys, for a display of daffodils. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1950 37 

Middlesex County Beekeeper's Association, for a beekeeping exhibit at the 

Spring Show. 
Mount Auburn Cemetery, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Norumbega Nursery, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Miss Elynor O'Neil, for an arrangement of white roses at the Spring Show. 
Richard C. Paine, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
E. F. Palmer, Ontario, Canada (at Buffalo, N. Y.), for a display of 12 or 

more kinds of lilies. 
John L. Russell, for a display of tulips. 
Mrs. Robert W. Sayles, for a display of daffodils. 

George Slate, Geneva, N. Y., (at Buffalo, N. Y.), for Lilium Brocade. 
The Walker's, for a display of gourds. 
Watson Camellia Gardens, Inc., for a display of camellias and camellia 

wedding arrangements. 

Bronze Medals 

Boston Aquarium Society, for an aquatic plant display at the Spring Show. 

j First Class Certificates 

White carnation Sidney Littlefield, exhibited by James Hudson Co. 
Chrysanthemum Mrs. Dewey, exhibited by Cummings The Florist. 
Dwarf pyrethrum, exhibited by Kenneth W. Houghton. 

Awards of Merit 

Camellia variegated P. N. Mutation of Nagasaki, exhibited by Dr. and 

Mrs. S. Lehman Nyce. 
Carnation Valentine, exhibited by Patten 8c Co. 

Chrysanthemum Footlights, exhibited by Bay State Nurseries, Inc. 
Chrysanthemum Opal, exhibited by Bay State Nurseries, Inc. 
Gladiolus Blue Devil, exhibited by J. R. & C. T. Larus. 
Miltonia Mrs. J. B. Crum, var. Chelsea X Chatham, exhibited by Edwin 

S. Webster. 
Rose Floradora, exhibited by Johnson Bros. Greenhouses, Inc. 
Rose Golden Scepter, exhibited by Jackson & Perkins Co. 
Rose Tawny Gold, exhibited by Jackson 8c Perkins Co. 

Votes of Commendation 

Carnation Lexington, exhibited by Russell Davenport. 

Carnation Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, exhibited by William Waltermire. 

Carnation Unique, exhibited by Patten 8c Co. 

Gladiolus Wedding Day, exhibited by Arthur C. Koerner. 

Petunia Fire Chief, exhibited by Mrs. J. K. Billingsley. 

Oriental poppy Edna Perry, exhibited by Mrs. Charles H. Haddrell. 



38 medals and certificates awarded in 1950 

Cultural Certificates 

Peter Arnott, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Peter Arnott, for a group of orchids. 

Robert Borowski, for a group of Coral Bell azaleas. 

James R. Cass, for Lilium speciosum rubrum Lucie Wilson. 

Joseph H. Hill Co., for rose Happiness. 

Chandler Hovey, for orchid plants. 

James Hurley, for Cymbidium pauwelsi. 

Harold S. Ross, for a display of tulips. 

John Sullivan, for a group of amaryllis. 

Fred Walters, for a group of odontoglossums. 

Vote of Thanks 

Arnold Arboretum, for Metasequoia glyptostroboides. 

Mrs. Thomas Barbour, for yellow corn and yellow tomatoes. 

Mrs. J. K. Billingsley, for an arrangement of pussywillows. 

G. Percy Brown, for Fall blooming iris. 

Mrs. Theodore Brown, for camellia Lindsey Neil. 

Mrs. Theodore Brown, for camellia Magnoliaeflora. 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., for arrangements of camellias and miscellaneous 

flowers 
George W. Dickey, for a rose specimen. 
Mrs. Charles H. Haddrell, for white Heuchera 
Mrs. Charles H. Haddrell, for an oriental poppy seedling 
Dr. and Mrs. S. Lehman Nyce, for camellia Petaloid Lady Clare. 
Dr. and Mrs. S. Lehman Nyce, for camellia Rainy Sun. 
Miss Eliza Philbrick, for an arrangement of cut flowers. 
Miss Eliza Philbrick, for mountain laurel. 
Robert O. Rubel, Jr., for camellia varieties 
Simoni's Flowers, for cut chrysanthemums. 

John B. Wills, for camellia Cheerful (Syn. Lucida, Hi-Otome, Kyo Botan). 
John B. Wills, for Camellia japonica elegans (Chandler). 

Honorable Mention 

Russell B. Kelly, for gladiolus seedling 
J. R. & C. T. Larus, for gladiolus Sequoia. 

Wyman's Framingham Nurseries, Mrs. Stuart Foster and Mrs. Howard 
Dunlop, for gladiolus arrangements. 



: ::;::;r.:"^::.:.;j. 

■ 



" 



Display of Orchids 1951 New England Spring Flower Show 
by L. Sherman Adams Company 




Display of Begonias 1950 Harvest Show 
by North Street Greenhouses 

39 



Report of the Treasurer 

The financial aspects of your Society's operations for the fiscal year ended 
December 31, 1950, were exceptionally gratifying. Income exceeded ex- 
penses by $20,306.03 as compared to a figure of $7,239.98 in the previous 
year. The improvement of about $13,000 as compared to 1949 may be 
traced to a higher income from our investments, to an enlarged member- 
ship, and to a most successful Spring Show. As might be expected in view 
of current trends, our operating expenses increased substantially, but 
nevertheless, the increases of income were able to offset our higher ex- 
penses and produce the fine results I have already mentioned. 

The itemized figures of our audited financial statement for 1950 are 
attached to this report and will be available to anyone who wishes to study 
them in detail. They reveal that to date your Society has been remarkably 
successful in coping with the steadily mounting expenses of our constantly 
expanding operations. We have maintained a strong and healthy financial 
position in the face of conditions that have caused great concern to other 
educational institutions. It is to be earnestly hoped that our prosperity 
will continue. It could never have been achieved without the constant in- 
terest of our members and the wisdom and energy of the executives and 
trustees. 

Stedman Buttrick, 

Treasurer 

Report of the Treasurer 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION ON 
DECEMBER 31, 1950 

Assets 

Cash in banks and on hand $ 69,237.44 

Accounts receivable — Horticulture 6,447.56 

Accounts receivable — Rent 1,767.00 

Due from employees 33.00 

Investments valued at book value 797,078.27 

Capital Assets 596,041.38 

Real Estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and additions to building 50,896.28 

L'bnuy 46,580.47 

$596,041.38 

Deferred Charges 7,714.52 

Spring Show, 1951 $ 4,313.55 

Advance on expenses 100.00 

Plant Buyer's Guide inventory 3,300.97 

$ 7,714.52 

$1,478,319.17 

40 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 4l 

Liabilities and Capital Funds 

Liabilities $ 17,034.61 

Accounts payable $ 15,967.69 

Taxes withheld 807.20 

Accrued commissions — Horticulture 259.72 

$ 17,034.61 

Deferred Income 681.98 

Sundry Funds 604,734.30 

Special Uses: Principal $167,920.73 

Unexpended Income 5,286.37 

$173,207.10 

General Uses: Principal 431,527.20 

$604,734.30 

Greater Endowment Fund 36,850.46 

Balance, January 1, 1950 $ 36,841.46 

Net addition— 1950 9.00 

$ 36,850.46 

Life Membership fees 32,591.00 

Mt. Auburn Cemetery Fund 55,053.52 

Show Insurance Fund 53,177.93 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 70,493.17 

Balance, January 1, 1950 $ 82,496.14 

Deduct: Net loss on securities sold 12,002.97 

$ 70,493.17 

Surplus (Earned) 43,177.50 



1,478,319.17 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

Income 



Income from investments 

Membership fees (after member's subscription to 

Horticulture) 

Rentals 

Spring Show 

Autumn Show 

Horticulture 

Garden Week 

Other receipts 



1950 


1949 


$ 57,339.78 


$ 45,173.17 


20,924.68 


17,385.87 


14,761.04 


15,066.70 


82,332.69 


60,607.96 


1,433.89 


1,027.84 


5,166.38 


1,056.39 


1,142.89 


215.71 


1,113.18 


792.50 



$171,013.99 $138,839.04 



42 REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

Expenditures 

Building Expense $ 32,526.28 $ 35,316.85 

Library Expense 16,035.46 14,708.85 

Office & General Salaries and Expenses 57,009.04 46,404.44 

Miscellaneous Exhibition Expense .- 3,588.47 7,708.28 

Awards, Lectures, Medals & Certificates 

Lectures paid from General Funds 854.94 391.24 

Prizes, Medals & Certificates paid from General 

Funds 3,686.10 4,114.03 

Prizes, Medals & Certificates paid from Spring 

Show 32,195.16 21,420.57 

Medals, Lectures, etc. paid from Restricted Funds 1,866.99 1,804.53 

Awards at Shows paid from Restricted Funds .. 2,881.84 3,248.34 



$150,644.26 $135,117.93 



Excess of Income over Expenditures, all Funds ... $ 20,369.73 $ 3,721.91 
Elimination of Expenses included above paid from 

restricted funds 6,653.14 10,228.94 



$ 27,022.87 $ 13,950.85 
Elimination of income included above allocated to 

restricted funds 6,716.84 6,710.87 

Excess of Income over Expenditures — General 
Funds $ 20,306.03 $ 7,239.98 



Results of the Balloting 

At 4:00 o'clock the polls were closed, 83 votes having been cast, and 
the following persons were declared elected: 

President: John S. Ames. 

Vice President: George Lewis, Jr. 

Trustees: (For three years) Mr. Albert C. Burrage, Mr. George B. 
Cabot, Mr. Walter Hunnewell, Mrs. William A. Parker and Mrs. Roger S. 
Warner. Trustee: (For one year) Mr. Aubrey B. Butler. 



Books Added to the Library 

May 1, 1950 — May 1, 1951 

HORTICULTURE 

General 

Brunning, L. H. A. The Australian gardener; 25th ed. Melbourne, 1940 

Edmond, J. B. (and others). Fundamentals of horticulture. N. Y., 1951 

Everett, T. H. Gardening handbook. Greenwich, Conn., 1951 

Farnsworth, Mrs. O. V. Gardening in West Texas. Abilene, 1949 

Gardner, V. R. Basic horticulture; rev. ed. N. Y., 1951 

Gladstone, Milton. Gardener and assistant gardener. N. Y., 1950 

Jex-Blake, A. J. Gardening in East Africa; 3d ed., Lond., 1950 

Laurie, Alex & Ries, V. H. Floriculture; 2nd ed. N. Y., 1950 

Newsham, J. C. Horticultural notebook; 4th ed., rev. by W. E. Shewell-Cooper. 

Lond.. 1950 
Smith, N. G. Organic surface cultivation. Lond., 1950 
Thompson, Mollie, ed. New gardening encyclopedia. Lond., 1949? 
Throm, E. L. & Kanameishi, B. M., ed. How to grow the best lawn and garden 

in your neighborhood. Chicago, 1951 
Williams, R. O. School gardening in the tropics; 3d ed. Lond., 1950 

Propagation and Pruning 

Hills, L. D. The propagation of Alpines. Lond., 1950 

Hottesj A. C. How to increase plants. N. Y., 1949 

John Innes Horticultural Institution. The fruit and the soil: collected edition 

of the John Innes leaflets. Lond., 1948 
Le Sueur, A. D. C. The care and repair of ornamental trees; rev. Lond., 1949 
Pearse, H. L. Growth substances and their practical importance in horticulture. 

Penglais, Eng., 1948 
Prockter, N. J. Simple propagating. N. Y., 1949 
Skoog, Folke, ed. Plant growth substances. Madison, Wise, 1950 
Thompson, C. R. The pruning of apples and pears by renewal methods. Lond., 

1949 

Horticultural History 
Anderson, A. W. The coming of the flowers (a history of garden plants) Lond., 

1950 
Boyd, L. E. Garden club memories and experiences (about the Garden Club of 

Virginia) 1950 
Hedrick, U. P. History of horticulture in America to 1860. N. Y., 1950 

AUXILIARY SCIENCES 

Soils 
Balfour, Lady E. B. The living soil; rev. ed. Lond., 1949 
Picton, L. J. Nutrition and the soil: thoughts on feeding. N. Y., 1949 
Russell, E. J. Soil conditions and plant growth; 8th ed., rev. by E. W. Russell. 

Lond., 1950 
Waksman, S. A. and Starkey, R. L. Soil and the microbe. N. Y. 1932 

Diseases and Pests 
Bawden, F. C. Plant viruses and virus diseases; 3d rev. ed. Waltham, 1950 
Cocannouer, J. A. Weeds, guardians of the soil. N. Y., 1950 
Metcalf, R. L. The mode of action of organic insecticides. Wash., 1948 

43 



44 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Sprague, Roderick. Diseases of cereals and grasses in North America. N. Y., 

1950 
Walker, J. C. Plant pathology. N. Y., 1950 
Westcott, Cynthia. Plant doctor; 3d ed. N. Y., 1950 

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 

General 
Beddall, J. L. Hedges for farm and garden. Lond., 1950 
Copley, G. H. Profitable flower growing. Lond., 1950? 
Everett, T. H. A guide to garden flowers; illus. by R. Freund. Racine, Wise, 

1945 
Faulkner, R. P. One hundred beautiful plants for the small garden. Lond., 

1949 
Frothingham, J. P. Success in gardening: work in the flower garden week by 

week. N. Y., 1913 
Hatfield, A. W. Flowers to know and grow. Lond., 1950 
Hoffman, J. L. The South, the land of flowers. Forsyth, Ga., 1949 

. 365 happy days in the garden. Forsyth, Ga., 1950 

Hottes, A. C. The book of perennials; 7th ed. N. Y., 1950 

Keene, R. W. B. Over the garden fence: Old-Timer talks about flowers. Lond., 

1948 
Macself, A. J. Simple rock gardening; American ed. N. Y., 1949 
Morton, J. W. 250 beautiful flowers and how to grow them; rev. ed. Lond., 

1949 
Nash, J. N. English garden flowers. Lond., 1948 
Salisbury, F. O., illus. In praise of flowers: reproductions of paintings; text by 

W. B. Thomas. Lond., 1948 
Sunset flower calendar, 1951. San Francisco, 1950 
Tabor, Grace. Making a garden bloom this year. N. Y., 1949 
Ten Eick, M. N. Florida plant checklist: names, accent, family and origin of 

. . . 4,200 plants; rev. ed. Tampa, 1950 
Your garden's flowers illustrated: a guide to the identification of all garden 

flowers; new and rev. ed. Lond., 1949 

Greenhouse and House Plants 
Bewley, W. F. Commercial glasshouse crops. Lond., 1950 
Lawrence, W. J. C. Science and the glasshouse; 2d ed. Lond., 1950 
Naumburg, S. S. The trick of growing house plants in every window; 2d ed. 

West Englewood, N. J., 1950 
Shewell-Cooper, W. E. A B C of the greenhouse. Lond., 1950 

. Modern glasshouse flowers for profit. Lond., 1949 

Taft, L. R. Heating greenhouses. Chicago, 1950? 

Monographs 
Allerton, F. W. Chrysanthemums for amateur and market grower. Lond., 1949 
American Iris Society. Iris, an ideal hardy perennial; rev. ed. Nashville Tenn., 

1950 ' 

American Rose Society. American rose annual, 1950. Harrisburg, Pa., 1950 
Austin, Lloyd. Rainbow iris manual. Placerville, Calif., 1950 
Boyle, L. M. Cymbidium orchids for you. Ojai, Calif., 1950 

N. L. The iris. Lond., 1950 
( olvin, Brenda. Trees for town and country; new ed. Lond., 1949 
Curtis, C. H. Orchids, their description and cultivation. Lond., 1950 
Dittmer, H. J. Lawn problems of the Southwest. Albuquerque, N. M., 1950 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 45 

Duursma, G. D. Pette's album voor cactus-liefhebbers. Wormerveer, 19 — ? 

Faulkner, R. P. The science of turf cultivation. Lond., 1950 

Gallagher, J. A. How to grow better roses. Pasadena, Calif., 1950 

Gamble, J. A. Roses unlimited. Harrisburg, Pa., 1950 

Haworth-Booth, Michael. The hydrangeas. Lond., 1950 

Higgins, Vera. The cactus grower's guide. Lond., 1950 

Hume, H. H. Camellias, kinds and culture. N. Y., 1951 

Ingwersen, Will. The dianthus. Lond., 1949 

Langdon, A. G. Tuberous begonia, its development and culture. Bath, Eng., 1949? 

Musser, H. B. Turf management. N. Y., 1950 

North American Lily Society. The lily yearbook, v. 3. Geneva, N. Y., 1950 

Park, Bertram. Roses. Lond., 1949 

Rector, C. K. How to grow African violets. San Francisco, 1951 

Reed, F. J. Lawns and playing fields. Lond., 1950 

Roan, H. M. (and others). Cactus and other succulent plants; 2d ed. Leeds, 

Eng., 1949 
Royal Horticultural Society. Classified list of daffodil names. Lond., 1950 

. The daffodil and tulip year book, no. 16. Lond., 1950 

Scott, E. L. & A. H. Chrysanthemums for pleasure; new ed. Bogota, N. J., 1950 

Southern California Camellia Society. Camellia research. Pasadena, 1950 

Werner, Alfred. The little book of roses. N. Y., 1949 

Wood, W. P. A fuchsia survey. Lond., 1950 

Woodcock, H. D. & Stearn, W. T. The lilies of the world, their cultivation and 

classification. Lond., 1949 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND HERBS 

Atkins, F. C. Mushroom growing today. N. Y., 1950 
Chandler, W. H. Deciduous orchards; 2d ed. Phil., 1942 

. Evergreen orchards. Phil., 1950 

Cosper, L. C. & Logan, H. B. How to grow vegetables. N. Y., 1951 

Crowther, Doreen. Fruit for small gardens. Lond., 1949 

Curtis, W. G. A guide to cloche gardening. St. Ives, Eng., 1949 

Eyster, W. H. The vegetable calendar. Emmaus, Pa., 1949 

Freeman, M. B. Herbs for the mediaeval household; 2d ed. N. Y., 1947 

Gayre, G. R. Common herbs and their uses. Gulval, Eng., 1950 

Great Britain. Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. Crop production in 

frames and cloches. Lond., 1948 
MacGillivray, J. H. Western vegetable production. Davis, Calif., 1948 
Mathieu, R. F. The herb grower's complete guide. Silverton, O., 1949 
Niven, L. A. The home orchard book. Birmingham, Ala., 1946 

. The Niven garden book. Birmingham, Ala., 1949 

Royal Horticultural Society. The fruit year book, no. 4. Lond., 1950 

Salaman, R. N. The history and social influence of the potato. Cambridge, Eng., 

1949 
Sunset magazine. Sunset vegetable garden book; rev. and enl. 2d ed. San Fran- 
cisco, 1950 
Taylor, H. V. The plums of England. Lond., 1949 

AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY 

Bethers, Ray. Perhaps I'll be a farmer. N. Y., 1950 

Klose, Nelson. America's crop heritage: the history of foreign plant introduction 

by the federal government. Ames, la., 1950 
Nearing, Helen & Scott. The maple sugar book. N. Y., 1950 
Root, A. I. The ABC and XYZ of bee culture: rev. by E. R. Root. Medina, O., 

1950 



46 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Smock, R. M. & Neubert, A. M. Apples and apple products. N. Y., 1950 

Sweeney, Frank. The changing forest situation: a study of conservation on 

state and private forest lands. N. Y., 1950 
Taylor, G. D. These hills are not barren: the story of a century farm. N. Y., 

1950 

NATURAL HISTORY 

Audubon, J. J. Audubon's Birds of America. N. Y., 1950 

Buck, M. W. In woods and fields, written and illustrated by M. W. Buck. N. Y., 

1950 
Green, Ivah. Partners with nature. Scranton, Pa., 1950 
Headstrom, Richard. The living year. N. Y., 1950 
Hylander, C. J. Sea arid shore. N. Y., 1950 
Krutch, J. W. Great American nature writing. N. Y., 1950 
McElroy, T. P., jr. Handbook of attracting birds. N. Y., 1950 

ECONOMICS AND CONSERVATION 

Allyn, R. S. Plant patents 1934 to 1943. Sandy Creek, N. Y., 1944 

Bromfield, Louis. Out of the earth. N. Y., 1950 

Fossum, M. T. Floricultural and ornamental horticultural economics. Chicago, 

1950 
Frank, Bernard & Netboy, Anthony. Water, land and people. 1950 
Garden Club of America. Conservation, please! ed. by A. H. Carhart. N. Y., 

1950 
Mezerik, A. G. Pursuit of plenty: the story of man's expanding domain. N. Y., 

1950 
Pinney, J. J. Beginning in the nursery business. Chicago, 1946 
Smith, G. — H. Conservation of natural resources. N. Y., 1950 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Aul, H. B. How to build garden structures. N. Y., 1950 

Daniels, F. P. You can landscape your own home. Long Lake, Minn., 1950 

Eckbo, Garrett. Landscape for living. N. Y., 1950 

Elliott, John. 65 practical garden plans. N. Y., 1950 

Howard, Ebenezer. Garden cities of tomorrow. Lond., 1946 

Hunziker, H. E. Developing nursery sales and display grounds. Chicago, 1946 

Johnson, L. R. How to landscape your grounds; 2d ed., rev. and enl. N. Y., 
1950 

Mt. Vernon Ladies' Ass'n of the Union. Mount Vernon, Virginia, an illustrated 
handbook. Mt. Vernon, 1948 

Siren, Osvald. China and gardens of Europe of the eighteenth century. N. Y., 
1950 

Sunset magazine. Sunset ideas for landscaping your home. San Francisco, 1950 

Virginia, Garden Club. Homes and gardens in old Virginia, ed. by F. A. Chris- 
tian & S. W. Massie; rev. Richmond, 1950 

Plant Materials 
Arnold-Forster, W. Shrubs for the milder counties. Lond., 1948 
Hay, Roy. Annuals; rev. ed. Lond., 1950 
Henrey, Blanche, illus. Trees and shrubs throughout the year; text by W. J. 

Bean. Lond., 1947 
Higgins, Vera, ed. Some good garden plants. Lond., 1950 
Mansfield, T. C. Shrubs in colour and cultivation. Lond., 1948 
Mej cer, F. A. & Hay, Roy. Gardens and gardening. N. Y., 1950 



;^ : ■ 




A Shadow Box Arrangement Featuring Orchids 1951 New 
England Spring Flower Show by Miss Elynor O'Neil 



47 



48 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Or tloff, H. S. & Raymore, H. B. Color and design for every garden. N. Y., 1951 
Robinson, F. B. Palette of plants. Champaign, 111., 1950 

Royal Horticultural Society. New plants of the year 1950, no. 3. Lond., 1950 
Tabor, Grace. Making the grounds attractive with shrubbery; new ed. N. Y„ 

1950 
Taylor, G. C. The modern garden; rev. ed. Lond., 1949 
Wigginton, B. E. Trees and shrubs for the southern Piedmont. Athens, Ga., 

1949 

BOTANY 

General 
Bean, W. J. Trees and shrubs hardy in the British Isles; 7th ed., v.l. Lond., 

1950 
Bonham, H. J. Aids to botany. Baltimore, 1934 
Clements, F. E. (and others). Adaptation and origin in the plant world: the 

role of environment in evolution. Waltham, 1950 
Curtis, O. F. and Clark, D. G. Introduction to plant physiology. N. Y., 1950 
Darlington, C. D. & Mather, K. The elements of genetics. Lond., 1950 
Faulkner, R. P. Botany for gardeners. N. Y., 1950 
Fuller, H. J. & Tippo, Oswald. College botany. N. Y., 1949 
Hagedoorn, A. L. Plant breeding. Lond.,, 1950 
Howes, F. N. Vegetable gums and resins. Waltham, 1949 

Hutchinson, John. British flowering plants: evolution and classification of fami- 
lies and genera. Lond., 1948 
Hutchinson, John & Melville, Ronald. The story of plants and their uses to man. 

Lond., 1948 
Hylander, C. J. & Stanley, O. B. College botany: a basic course in plant science. 

N. Y., 1949 
Kierstead, S. P. Natural dyes. Bost., 1950 

Muenscher, W. C. Keys to woody plants; 6th ed. Ithaca, N. Y., 1950 
Ochse, J. J. Vegetables of the Dutch East Indies. Buitenzorg, 1931 
Oellinger, Georg. Herbarium des Georg Oellinger, anno 1553 zu Niirnberg. 

Salzburg, 1949 
Robbins, W. W. Sc Weier, T. E. Botany: an introduction to plant sciences. N. Y., 

1950 
Sears, P. B. Charles Darwin, naturalist, as a cultural force. N. Y., 1950 
Shimer, H. W. Plant names, their origin and meaning. Bost., 1950 
Smith, J. R. Tree crops (new ed.) N. Y., 1950 
Stebbins, G. F. Variation and evolution in plants. N. Y., 1950 

Monographs 
Anderson, Edgar. The corn plant of today. Des Moines, 1949 
Benson, Lyman. The cacti of Arizona; 2d ed. Tuscon, 1950 
Brooke, Jocelyn. The wild orchids of Britain. Lond., 1950 
Buller, A. H. R. Researches on fungi, v. 7. Toronto, 1950 
Cornish, Vaughan. The churchyard yew and immortality. Lond., 1946 
Correll, D. S. Native orchids of North America, north of Mexico. Waltham, 

Mass., 1950 
Dallimore, W. & Jackson, A. B. Handbook of coniferae; 3d ed. Lond., 1948 
Durand, Herbert. Field book of common ferns; rev. ed. N. Y„ 1950 
Finan, J. J. Maize in the great herbals. Waltham, Mass., 1950 
Reynolds, G. W. The aloes of South Africa. Johannesburg, 1950 
Stokoe, W. J. The observer's book of British ferns. Lond., 1950 
Taylor, G. M. British herbs and vegetables. Lond., 1947 
Waksman, S. A. The actinomycetes. Waltham, Mass., 1950 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 49 

Floras — United States 
Billington, Cecil. Shrubs of Michigan; 2d ed. Bloomfield Hills, 1949 
Everett, T. H. A guide to wild flowers: field flowers; illus. by R. Freund. Racine, 

Wise, 1945 
. A guide to wild flowers: woodland flowers; illus. by R. Freund. Ra- 
cine, Wise, 1945 
Grimm, W. C. The trees of Pennsylvania. Harrisburg, 1950 
Howell, J. T. Marin flora: manual of the flowering plants and ferns of Marin 

County, California. Berkeley, 1949 
Jones, G. N. Flora of Illinois, containing keys for identification of the flower- 
ing plants and ferns; 2d ed. Notre Dame, Ind., 1950 
Peattie, D. C. A natural history of trees of eastern and central North America. 

Bost., 1950 
Van Melle, P. J. The blue book of trees: a guide to ashes, birches, elms, maples, 
etc. of North America; illus. by R. Freund. N. Y., 1948 

. The red book of trees: a guide to cedars, firs, hemlocks, etc. of North 

America; illus. by R. Freund. N. Y., 1948 
Zim, H. S. & Martin, A. C. Flowers: a guide to familiar American wildflowers. 
N. Y., 1950 

Floras — Other Countries 
Carey, M. C. Wild flowers at a glance; drawings by Dorothy Fitchew. Lond., 

1950 
Coley, H. M. Wild flowers round the year. Lond., 1947 
Cowen, D. V. Flowering trees and shrubs in India. Lond., 1950 
Jex-Blake, Lady Muriel. Some wild flowers of Kenya. Lond., 1948 
Kidd, M. M. Wild flowers of the Cape (of Good Hope) peninsula. Oxford, 1950 
Lousley, J. E. Wild flowers of chalk and limestone. Lond., 1950 
Morse, Richard. Introduction to wild flowers. Lond., 1949 
Morton, B. R. Native trees of Canada; 4th ed. Ottawa, 1949 
Philipson, W. R. Wild flowers. Lond., 1950 

Post, G. E. Flora of Syria, Palestine and Sinai; 2d rev. &: enl. Beirut, 1932-33 
Richards, E. C. Our New Zealand trees and flowers; 2d ed. Christchurch, 1949 
Williams, R. O. The useful and ornamental plants in Zanzibar and Pemba. Zan- 
zibar, 1949 

ESSAYS AND POETRY 

Allwood, M. C. English countryside and gardens; 2 v. Sussex, 1947 

Firbank, Thomas. I bought a mountain. Bost., 1940 

Pim, Sheila. Bringing the garden indoors. Lond., 1949 

Richardson, N. S. At the Bow of the Ox: a year's doings. Bost., 1950 

Stephens, T. A. My garden's scrap book of wit and wisdom. Lond., 1949 

Stevenson, Burton. Home book of quotations. N. Y., 1935 

Taber, G. B. Stillmeadow seasons. Phil., 1950 

Walker, R. S. State flowers and state birds. Litchfield, 111., 1951 

FINE ARTS 

Black, Arthur. Landscape sketching. N. Y., 1950 

Blunt, Wilfred. The art of botanical illustration. Lond., 1950 

Blunt, Wilfred. Flower books and their illustrators: an exhibition arranged for 

the National Book League. Cambridge, Eng., 1950 
Guldener, Hermine van. Flowers: the flower piece in painting; tr. from the 

Dutch. Lond., 1950 
Lewis, Frank. Flower arrangements: a book of designs for the designing studio. 

Leighton-on-Sea, Eng., 1949 



50 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

FLOWER ARRANGEMENT 

Fisher, L. B. An eighteenth century garland. Williamsburg, Va., 1951 

Fleming, Joy. Floristry and flower arranging. Kingswood, Eng., 1950 

Florists' Publishing Co. The album of design: funeral flowers; 19th ed. Chicago, 

194? 

Hayes, NY.G. Roadside arrangements (dried materials) Berkeley, Calif., 1950 

Jones, Ina. Arranging church flowers. Dallas, 1950 

Naumburg, Sophia. The trick of making your own corsages. West Englewood, 
N. J., 1950 

Roberts, P. E. The book of table arrangements. N. Y., 1951 

Shoji, Kane & Johnson, Violet. Japanese principles of design in flower arrange- 
ment. Seattle, 1950 

Stevenson, Violet. Flower decoration for the home. Lond., 1950 

Vogue in flowers; 8th ed. Chicago, 1950 

Wilson, H. van P. The flower arrangement calendar for 1951. N. Y., 1950 

Wilson, H. van P. The joy of flower arranging. N. Y., 1951 

BIOGRAPHY 

American men of science; 8th ed. Lancaster, Pa., 1949 

Brink, Wellington. Big Hugh (Bennett) the father of soil conservation. N. Y., 

1951 
Brun, Charles. Olivier de Serres, gentilhomme de la terre. Paris, 1943 
Hunt, M. L. Better known as Johnny Appleseed (John Chapman) Phil., 1950 
Raven, C. E. John Ray, naturalist. Cambridge, Eng., 1942 
Who was who in America, v. 2, 1943-1950. Chicago, 1950 

TRAVEL AND PLANT HUNTING 

Bakeless, John. The eyes of discovery: the pageant of North America as seen 

by the first explorers. Phil., 1950 
Danby, Hope. The garden of perfect brightness: - the history of Yuan Ming 

Yuan and of the emperor who lived there. Chicago, 1950 
MacBride, J. F. Natural landscapes of the United States. Chicago, 1950 
Phillips, J. D. Pepper and pirates: adventures in the Sumatra pepper trade of 

Salem. Bost., 1949 
Roger-Smith, Hugh. Plant hunting in Europe. Bedford, Eng., 1950 
Sandeman, Christopher. A wanderer in Inca land. Lond., 1948 
Ward, F. Kingdon. Burma's icy mountains. Lond., 1949 

BIBLIOGRAPHY AND LANGUAGES 

Condit, I. J. Bibliography on the Avocado; 2d ed. Riverside, Calif., 1950 
Fischer, G. W. The smut fungi: a guide to the literature, with bibliography. 

N. Y., 1951 
Fowler, H. W. A dictionary of modern English usage. Lond., 1927 
Savory, T. H. Latin and Greek for biologists. Lond., 1946 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS 

Blyton, Enid. Let's garden. Lond., 1948 

Hoi berg, R. L. Restless Johnny, the story of Johnny Appleseed (John Chap- 
man) N. Y., 1950 
Parker, B. M. Domesticated plants. Evanston, 111., 1949 
Selsam, M. E. Play with trees. N. Y., 1950 
Stevens, James. Tree treasure: a conservation story. Portland, Ore., 1950 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 51 

GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with thanks gifts to the 
Library from the following donors: 

Andorra Nurseries, Inc. 

Andorra hand-book of trees and shrubs. 

Crosby, Mrs. S. V. R. 

Index Rafinesquianus, by E. D. Merrill. 

Farrington, E. I 

Who was who in America; v. 2. 1943-1950. 

Foley, Daniel J. 

Mount Vernon, Virginia, an illustrated handbook. 

Freund, Rudolf. 

Everett. A guide to garden flowers. 

. A guide to wild flowers: field flowers. 

. A guide to wild flowers: woodland flowers. 

Van Melle. The blue book of trees. 
. The red book of trees. 

Garden Club of America. 
Conservation, please! 

Hughes, Mrs. Wayne. 
Dykes. Notes on tulip species. 

Otis, Mrs. Herbert. 

Hill. Forty years of gardening. 
Macneil. Garden lilies. 

Quint, Harry. 

Bigelow. Book of pressed specimens of European flowers. 

Thibodeau, John. 

Alpine Garden Society. Index to the Bulletin, vol. 1-15. 

Cox, E. H. M. Plant-hunting in China. 

Royal Horticultural Society. Daffodil year-book, 1914. 

Warren, Mrs. Fiske. 
Flowering plants of South Africa: Oct. 1933 to Oct. 1938. 

Waters, Mrs. Edward A. 

Eaton. Ferns of North America. 

Lowe. Ferns, British and exotic. 

Meehan. Native flowers and ferns of the United States. 

Merrill. Herbarium volume of fern specimens. 

Williams, Mrs. Frances 

Shimer. Plant names, their origin and meaning. 

Winfield, Mrs. James E 

McFarland. Memoirs of a rose man. 
Wright, Mrs. Irving 

A scrap book of garden design 



1950 Garden Week in Massachusetts 

The Second Annual Garden Week in Massachusetts was held May 21-27, 
1950. Under the auspices of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, fifty- 
two of the most beautiful gardens and houses in the eastern part of our 
Commonwealth were opened for the enjoyment of thousands of visitors 
from every section of the United States. 

Preparations for this gala event began early the preceding autumn 
and continued until the opening day itself. As this was a comparatively 
new project, there was much to be done to arouse the interest of the 
public and to broaden knowledge of the beauty of our New England 
gardens. 

An effective organization was created to administer the project. The 
Board of Directors visited all of the gardens, developed the program and 
guided the policies throughout the year. An Executive Committee of 
twenty-six (numbering among its members the presidents of seventeen 
local garden clubs) carried out the program, by assisting the owners in 
the various places where gardens were open and by attending to the 
myriad details so incident to such a widespread and extensive activity. 
Members of this group formed smaller committees to facilitate the ac- 
complishment of their work. 

The Noanett, Milton, Chestnut Hill, North Shore, Boxford and New- 
buryport Garden Clubs served lunches and teas and conducted plant sales 
in certain of the gardens. These local clubs received the substantial profits 
from these special activities, but all admission fees were retained by the 
Society. 

As soon as it was learned that the dates of the Boston Jubilee would 
overlap ours, a mutually satisfactory plan for an affiliation was worked 
out. A special Garden Week-Jubilee Committee promoted several Jubilee 
affairs. This Committee arranged with the Beacon Hill Garden Club to 
have a number of its houses and gardens open during the Jubilee. The 
Society received half of the proceeds of this event. 

Daily bus tours were scheduled through the cooperation of the Boston 
and Maine Transportation Company. In accordance with the aims of the 
Society, this made it possible for many more people to visit the gardens — 
both those who could not obtain other means of transportation and those 
who came from out of state. Great praise is due the careful drivers and 
A. G. Moody in particular of the Boston and Maine Transportation Com- 
pany. Mr. Moody accompanied each tour and contributed much to the 
comfort of all. These tours resulted in a substantial profit for the Society. 

The completed program with maps, illustrations, information, bus 
schedules and advertisements made an attractive Guide Book. 

It is impossible to give just credit in this brief report to all the organi- 
sations and individuals who assisted us so generously in our efforts to 

52 



1950 GARDEN WEEK IN MASSACHUSETTS 53 

publicize the event. Everyone extended their facilities unstintingly with 
the result that through Garden Week the Society received most favorable 
publicity all over the country, from October 1949 until the close of Garden 
Week in May 1950. National magazines, local periodicals, garden and 
other club publications printed our stories and pictures. The charming 
poster designed for us by William T. Aldrich caught the eye of thousands 
who saw it displayed in shop windows, nurseries, travel bureaus and trans- 
portation terminals. Five copies of our illustrated lecture were in constant 
circulation among organizations at their meetings in this and other states. 
The Boston Chamber of Commerce was of great assistance. A luncheon 
given by Mrs. John S. Ames for members of the Press and Radio won 
their hearty cooperation and support. Filene's devoted six Summer Street 
windows to Garden Week displays. One of these deserves special mention; 
the glass was removed and the public was able to walk through an enchant- 
ing garden in the heart of our busiest shopping center. It is estimated 
that more than ten thousand persons dropped coins into the fountain. 
This money was donated for the purchase of flowers for the poor in local 
hospitals. The entire planting for the window gardens was done by Donald 
Wyman of the Bay State Nurseries without cost to the Society. 

Garden Week derived immense benefit from these months of painstak- 
ing preparation. Approximately seven thousand persons representing not 
less than thirty-four states visited the various gardens. The genuine hos- 
pitality of the owners, the beauty and variety of the gardens and their 
high standard of maintenance won the praise and admiration of our 
visitors; many were veterans at garden festivities in all parts of the country. 

As a token of appreciation for the generosity of the owners in opening 
their places during Garden Week in 1949 and 1950, the Society has pre- 
sented to them a three year old specimen of the hardy Mimosa or Silk 
tree (Albizzia julibrissin rosea). These were raised at the Arnold Arboretum 
and were obtained for the Society through the courtesy of Dr. Donald 
Wyman one of the enthusiastic Garden Week Directors. 

This report would not be complete without expressing our gratitude 
to the members of the staff at Horticultural Hall who so cheerfully an- 
swered inquiries, mailed out hundreds of copies of the Garden Week 
Guide Book and aided in countless ways to smooth out many an annoying 
detail to insure the success of our enterprise. 

Garden Week in Massachusetts has infinite possibilities for develop- 
ment and future growth in a peaceful world. It is our earnest wish that it 
may continue to enhance the good will and enviable reputation of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 

Mary May Binney, Chairman 

Garden Week in Massachusetts 



Report of the Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and 
Flower Mission 

Crocus, daffodils, tulips herald the Spring! Need one remind members of 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Society of that fact? But did you ever 
notice a quite different blossom — an annual — that may be gathered in the 
Spring? I refer to those ANNUAL REPORTS that come to life along with 
the daffodils! And here is one more "blossom" for the unusual bouquet. 

The Fruit and Flower Mission is about to enter the 82nd year of its 
special service and the 27th year that we have had the privilege of making 
our headquarters in Horticultural Hall. There is no yardstick by which 
to measure the deeper value of the service we are able to render to the 
lonely, the sick, the shut-ins whose lives we brighten through the gifts of 
the flowers, fruit, and fresh vegetables given us by the exhibitors at the 
Shows. So many of the small institutions that care for the aged, in whom 
we are especially interested, work on such limited budgets that the addition 
of the fresh vegetables and fruit we give them is a veritable godsend. A 
most unexpected, deeply appreciated "windfall" came our way this summer, 
through the garden exhibit in one of Filene's store windows, during Garden 
Week. People mistook the bird bath for a wishing-well and when a sizable 
sum of money had accumulated it was decided to> give it to some worthy 
charity. Thanks to the intervention of Mr. Arno H. Nehrling and two of 
our directors, we were the recipients of that fund. 

Our hamper and holiday basket projects reached a new high during the 
past year. Thousands of people in the most congested districts in Boston 
were treated to a breath of the country through the distribution of the 
flowers sent in from 26 towns to the four neighborhood houses that coop- 
erate with us. Though we have been losing more towns each season, 
due to the closing of local railroad stations, those remaining seem to work 
all the harder to make up for the loss. The town of Harvard, which stands 
in a class by itself, according to> our records, again covered itself with glory 
by shipping a bumper crop of 245 hampers on two days this summer. 
Hingham managed to send in 83 hampers — the highest next to Harvard — 
though greatly handicapped by the removal of their railroad station. 

The highlight of the year for some of our clients is the visit to the 
ANNUAL SPRING FLOWER SHOW. A trip through this "Wonder- 
land" gives many hours of happiness in retrospect — as well as the immedi- 
ate pleasure — to one shut in for most of the year in some dreary little 
room. With a wave of her wand, made of a sheaf of tickets to the Show, 
our good "fairy godmother" makes this possible for many of our clients. 
A note of acknowledgment of one of these tickets came from a woman 
living in a basement room. It reads: "I am laid up from a very bad fall, 
but I think I am very lucky because I fell, after I had seen the Show 
because now I can forget my pain when I think of all the beauty I saw 
that day. Thank you very much — and the kind lady who sends the tickets." 

We are so glad to be invited to be a part of that bouquet of ANNUAL 
REPORTS each year for it gives us an opportunity to express our grati- 
tude to the Trustees of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 

Ida A. Perkins, 
Executive Secretary 

54 



Necrology 



Mr. Robert B. Anderson 
Mr. Anselm L. Bacon 
Dr. Hugh P. Baker 
Mr. Lorenzo Baker 
Mrs. L. H. Baldwin 
Rev. James Bancroft 
Mrs. William H. Ballard 
Harold C. Bean, M.D. 
Mr. Charles H. Benson 
Mr. Henry J. Bensen 
Mr. Charles S. Blake 
Miss Bertha B. Bliss 
Mr. L. C. Bobbink 
Mr. David W. Bowie 
Mrs. Cuthbert Bowles 
Mr. Albert Boyden 
Mr. Lyon Carter 

Miss Marion L. Chamberlain 

/ 

Mrs. Albert H. Chatfield 
Mrs. William C. Conant 
Mr. Francis B. Crowninshieli 
Mr. Marshall F. Cummings 
Mr. Richard C. Curtis 
Mrs. George M. Dorrance 
Mr. William F. Drummey 
Mr. Caleb A. Eastman 
Mr. Henry Eaton 
Mrs. Clinton L. Eddy 
Miss Edith B. Fabeus 
Miss Hope Fagan 
Miss Adalena R. Farmer 
Mrs. Carrie F. Farrar 
Mr. H. Bruce Fletcher 
Mrs. Harriett R. Foote 
Mrs. Henry Ford 
Irving W. Fraim, M.D. 
Mrs. Robert M. Franklin 
Mrs. Nellie V. Fraser 



Mrs. C. Larratt Gamsby 
Mr. James Geehan 
Mr. Lyman R. Allen 
Mr. William H. Allyn 
Miss Myra D. Gifford 
Mrs. Louis C. Grossmann 
Mrs. Charles H. Haddrell 
Mrs. George W. Hamblet 
Prof. N. E. Hansen 
Mr. T. Edward Hirst 
Mr. Sidney Hoffman 
Mrs. Miles Holden 
Mr. Edward Jackson Holmes 
Mr. F. C. Holmes 
Mr. Stillman L. Hovey 
Mrs. Edwin M. Howard 
Mrs. Perez B. Howard 
Mrs. Thomas F. Howath 
Mrs. Benjamin S. Howe 
Mrs. George L. Hyde 
Mr. Alexander S. Jack 
Mr. John Jaeger 
Mr. Warren W. Jermain 
Mrs. Lillian F. Kauffmann 
Mrs. Herbert Kearns 
Mrs. John C. Kiley 
Mrs. Walter C. King 
Mrs. James M. Knight 
Mrs. Max Leavitt 
Mr. Roland E. Lee 
Mr. Robert M. Lennox 
Mr. Charles A. Litchfield 
Miss Mabel Lyman 
Mr. James R. Manning 
Rev. W. J. McCarthy 
Dr. George R. Minot 
Miss Madeline K. Morse 
Mr. Charles S. Moulton 



Mr. Elbridge K. Newhall 
Dr. Albert P. Norris 
Mr. John J. O'Brien 
Mr. C. Sharpless Pastorius 
Miss Mary L. Patten 
Miss Charlotte Peirce 
Mr. Ralph D. Pet tingell 
Mr. Preston Pond 
Mrs. Virgil C. Pond 
Mrs. Forrest E. Porter 
Mr. Earle L. Pratt 
Mrs. Joseph Pratt 
Mr. Edward W. Pride 
Mrs. Frederic J. Quinn 
Mrs. Louise H. Radford 
Mrs. Bertha H. Rauscher 
Mr. Arthur P. Rice 
Mr. Harry L. Rice 
Mr. A. Richards 
Mr. William R. Sampson 
Mrs. AnniE I. Sanderson 
Mr. Max Shoolman 
Mr. Giles M. Smith 
Mrs. Louis C. Smith 
Mrs. Lewis R. Speare 
Mrs. Mary L. Thompson 
Mr. Arthur O. Tucker 
Mrs. Henry Guild Tucker 
Mrs. M. M. Van Beuren 
Mr. George H. Walker 
Miss Edith Wallace 
Mrs. Rachel Lane Wescott 
Mr. Frank S. White 
Mr. Alfred W. Whitman 
Mr. John S. Whittemore 
Mr. Fred A. Wilson 
Miss Fernanda C. Wolff 
Mr. Wendell W. Wyman 



55 



Honorary Members 



1942 Lord Aberconway, North Wales, England 

1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Walter D. Brownell, Little Compton, Rhode Island 

1942 Dr. William A. Dayton, Washington, D. C. 

1942 David Fairchild, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Joseph B. Gable, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Henry Hicks, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1942 Fred H. Howard, Montebello, California 

1942 Colonel R. H. Montgomery, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Robert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. N earing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Frederick Law Olmstead, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1942 Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson, New York, New York 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Dr. A. B. Stout, New York, New York 

1942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 C J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1942 Elizabeth C. White, Whitesbog, New Jersey 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
1 943 Vincent DePetris, Grosse Farms, Michigan 

1943 Edward I. Farrington, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

1943 Jens Jensen, Ellison Bay, Wisconsin 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 

1944 E. O. Orpet, Santa Barbara, California 

1944 Wilfrid Wheeler, Hatchville, Falmouth, Massachusetts 

1944 Richardson Wright, New York, New York 

1945 Joseph H. Hill, Richmond, Indiana 

1945 Albert Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1945 Jacob K. Shaw, Amherst, Massachusetts 

1946 Walter B. Clarke, San Jose, California 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Brien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

1947 Dr. A. F. Blakeslee, Northampton, Massachusetts 

1947 Thomas H. Everett, New York Botanical Garden, New York 

1947 James J. Hurley, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

1947 Dr. Elmer Drew Merrill, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

1947 Isabella Preston, Lancaster, England 

1948 Ernest Borowski, Norwood, Massachusetts 
1948 Stedman Buttrick, Concord, Massachusetts 
1948 Ernest F. Coe, Coconut Grove, Florida 
1948 John L. Russell, Dedham, Masachusetts 

1948 Eric Walther, San Francisco, California 

1949 Morris Carter, Boston, Massachusetts 
1949 Henry Kohankie, Painesville, Ohio 

1949 George H. Palmer, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

1949 A. Kenneth Simpson, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

1949 Harold B. Tukey, East Lansing, Michigan 

1 950 Montague Free, New York, New York 

1950 Dr. Wilson Popenoe, Tegucigalpa, Honduras 

1950 Kenneth Post, Ithaca, New York 

1 950 George L. Slate, Geneva, New York 

1951 William Hertrich, San Marino, California 
1951 Dr. Samuel L. Emsweller, Beltsville, Maryland 
1951 Jan de Graaff, Gresham, Oregon 

1951 Thomas C. Desmond, Newburgh, New York 

1951 Robert G. Chamberlain, North Easton, Mass. 

1951 Mary May Binney, Milton, Mass. 

56 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 

FOR more than a century the Massachusetts Horticultural Society has 
been favored by the generosity of its members whose patronage has 

made possible an Endowment Fund for carrying on its multitudinous ac- 
tivities for the promotion of horticulture in this commonwealth. Further- 
more, the Society has contributed greatly to the ever increasing develop- 
ment of horticultural influence and achievement throughout the country. 
It is hoped that the Massachusetts Horticultural Society will be remem- 
bered by those members who wish to distribute their funds for public 
benefaction in the fields of the arts and sciences. All bequests are tax- 
exempt. This Society enjoys an enviable reputation for its solid financial 
condition and its judicious method of handling investments. Since expenses 
for maintenance and activities are ever on the increase, additional funds 
are needed to carry on and to extend the services of this Society — "for 
the advancement of horticulture." 



Form of Bequest 

I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum 

of to be used as the Board of Trustees 

may direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various 
forms and for extending the activities of the Society along 
educational lines. 

Signed 






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YEARBOOK 

1952 

MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

PRICE ONE DOLLAR 




1952 

FLOWER SHOWS 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
IN HORTICULTURAL HALL 

JANUARY 24 and 25 

Camellia Show 

MARCH 9 to 15 (Mechanics Bldg.) 
Spring Show 

MAY 5 and 6 
Daffodil Show 

MAY 15 and 16 
Tulip Show 

JUNE 24 and 25 
Roses, Annuals, Perennials and Early Vegetables 

AUGUST 18 and 19 
Gladiolus Show 

AUGUST 27 and 28 
Exhibition of the Products of Children's Gardens 

OCTOBER 8, 9 and 10 
Harvest Show 

NOVEMBER 6 to 9 
Chrysanthemum Show 

(Dates subject to change) 



1952 YEARBOOK 

of the 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 




ANNUAL REPORTS 
for 

1951 
and a List of Books added to the Library 



FOREWORD • The Committee on Lectures and Publications has the 
honor to present herewith the 29th number of the Society's Yearbook, 
with which are combined the annual reports for the year 1951. 
Boston, Massachusetts, July 1, 1952 R. A. Van Meter, Chairman 







Mrs. James Perkins 
Elected a Trustee, May 5, 1952 



Photo: G. M. CUSHING JR. 



CONTENTS 

Board of Government 5 

Committees of the Society • 7 

President's Address 9 

Report of the Secretary 12 

Report of Exhibitions Committee 18 

Report on Children's Gardens 21 

Report of Prize Committee 23 

Garden Committee Awards 25 

Report of the Library Committee 27 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1951 32 

Special Medal Awards 34, 38, 39 

Report of the Treasurer 43 

Results of the Balloting . 45 

Books Added to the Library 46 

Benevolent Fruit and Flower Mission 54 

Necrology 55 

Honorary Members 56 

Bequests to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 57 

Cover Illustration: Regal Lilies, which have become one of America's most 
popular, hardy, garden plants for early Summer bloom since their introduction, 
more than forty years ago, by E. H. Wilson who nearly lost his life gathering the 
bulbs from a rocky mountainside in Western China. Photograph: P. E. Genereux. 

3 




Photo: GENEREUX 



Dr. George O. Clark, Vice President of the Society, presents the 

Albert G. Burrage Gold Vase to President John S. Ames for the 

most outstanding exhibit in 1951 — a formal azalea garden 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

President 
JOHN S. AMES 

Vice Presidents 

GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Trustees 
John S. Ames * Seth L. Kelsey (1954) 

Ernest Boro wski (1953) Ray M. Koon (1953) 

Albert C. Burrage (1954) George Lewis, Jr. * 

Aubrey B. Butler (1955) Elmer D. Merrill (1953) 

George W. Butterworth (1955) Mrs. William A. Parker (1954) 
Stedman Buttrick * Mrs. James Perkins (1955) 

Dr. George O. Clark (1955) Harold S. Ross (1953) 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby (1953) R. A. Van Meter (1955) 

Walter Hunnewell (1954) Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1954) 

Oliver Wolcott * 

Treasurer 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK 

Assistant Treasurer 
GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 

Secretary 
ARNO H. NEHRLING 



* Members ex-officio. Dates are those of expiration terms. 

5 




Photo: GENEREUX 



Flower Arrangement by Mrs. Archibald Feinberg. Received the 
greatest number of points in the flower arrangement section of the 
New England Spring Flower Show 1952 and was given the John 

Taylor Arms Award 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 
For the Year Ending May 1, 1953 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 
WALTER HUNNEWELL 



Executive Committee 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Finance Committee 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

Budget Committee 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

Membership Committee 
RAY M. KOON, Chairman 



GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 

Committee on Exhibitions 
DR. ELMER D. MERRILL, Chairman 



GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 



DR. R. A. VAN METER 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 



HAROLD S. ROSS 



GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 
RAY M. KOON 



MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 
HAROLD D. STEVENSON 



Committee on Prizes 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 

/ 



ALBERT C. BURRAGE 
MRS. S. V. R. CROSBY 



ERNEST BOROWSKI, Chairman 
THOMAS MILNE, Co-Chairman 

EDMUND MEZITT 

Committee on Library 

DR. ELMER D. MERRILL, Chairman 



JAMES METHVEN 



MRS. SUSAN McKELVEY 
MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 



AUBREY B. BUTLER 



ERNEST BOROWSKI 
DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 



ALEXANDER I. HEIMLICH 
WALTER HUNNEWELL 



Committee on Lectures and Publications 

DR. R. A. VAN METER, Chairman 

ERNEST HOFTYZER 

Committee on Special Medals 

HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 



DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 



Committee on Gardens 

OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 

Committee on Building 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 



DR. ELMER D. MERRILL 
DR. R. A. VAN METER 



SETH L. KELSEY 
MRS. JAMES PERKINS 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 

Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 

MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, Chairman 
DANIEL W. O'BRIEN MRS. HENRY D. TUDOR 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 



ERNEST BOROWSKI 
ALBERT C. BURRAGE 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 
SETH L. KELSEY 



RAY M. KOON, Chairman 



DR. ELMER D. MERRILL 
MRS. JAMES PERKINS 



Nominating Committee 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 

MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 




J 

Specimen bloom of an Odontoglossum orchid 



Photo: GENEREUX 



8 



REPORTS OF OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

Presented at the Annual Meeting, May 5, 1952 

The annual meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was held 
at Horticultural Hall, Boston, on May 5, 1952, at 3:00 P.M., with the President, 
Mr. John S. Ames, in the chair. He appointed as tellers Mr. Richard Husselbee, 
Miss Lorraine Charron, Miss Nancy Bellows and Mrs. Claire Rochefort. 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the Executive Secretary, read the call for the meet- 
ing. By vote, the reading of the minutes of the previous annual meeting was 
waived. The following addresses and reports were read: 

The President 's Address 

The Massachusetts horticultural society is but two years away from its 
125th Anniversary. As we review the record of nearly a century and a quar- 
ter we are convinced, I am sure, that our organization has contributed greatly 
to the advancement of Horticulture throughout the country. The Society has 
grown slowly but steadily over the years, and each new achievement has only 
served to highlight the services which we have rendered in the past. To garden- 
minded persons and plant collectors all over New England and, in fact, all over 
America, our flower shows and our publication HORTICULTURE have 
provided inspiration and suggestions for better gardens and the thoughtful 
cultivation of plants. 

Without doubt, our ever-increasing membership would be amazed to know 
some of the questions that our staff receives over a period of a year. Every phase 
of horticulture is involved, and it is significant that many of the inquiries are 
from people whose garden interest is extremely wide. 

Our magazine HORTICULTURE, now in its 48th year of publication, 
covers the field in a most adequate manner. Contributors, both amateur and 
professional, give our readers the benefits of their experiments and experiences. 
Our Yearbook gives each member a methodical record of the progress of the 
Society, in addition to furnishing a list of all the new books which have been 
added to our Library during the past year. 

It is gratifying to know that a steadily-increasing number of our members 
are taking advantage of the services offered by our Library staff. As you review 
the list of new books acquired, it will be apparent to you that no phase of horti- 
culture has been overlooked in the collection of volumes which fill our shelves. 
It has come to my attention, on several occasions, that the general public finds 
our Library useful and numerous students, and university scholars in the field 
of horticulture as well as the allied sciences have taken advantage of our ex- 
tensive sources of research. 

We have passed the fiftieth milestone in our present location, and I am 
happy to report that our building is in excellent condition. General housekeep- 
ing and over-all management are in good hands, and we continue to make im- 
provements as our income permits. 



THE PRESIDENTS ADDRESS 

Within a few weeks we shall play host to the Annual Convention of the 
Men's Garden Clubs of America. This event serves to remind me of the services 
we render to more than a dozen specialized plant societies whose offices are 
housed within the building. 

Through our medal awards and our extensive lecture series we are able to 
recognize skilled horticulturists in all parts of the world. Those who come and 
lecture here share with us, in a great measure, their knowledge and the benefits 
of their research and experience. 

A service which is often overlooked as one of the functions of the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society is the outstanding public relations which our 
Society carries on with newspapers and other publications. Prior to, and during 
the time of our Flower Shows we have received the unlimited support of the 
press. Each year all our activities are notably publicized, and editors of many 
Metropolitan newspapers take occasion to comment favorably on the events 
which we sponsor. 

It is a significant fact that over the years the Society has encouraged the 
interest and enthusiasm of the children of Metropolitan Boston in their school 
garden program. Furthermore, various judging contests sponsored by the So- 
ciety have great appeal to students in advanced agricultural schools all over the 
Commonwealth and at our State University as well. 

In passing, it is only proper that I should mention the significance of our 
Flower Shows and the pleasures they bring to the thousands of visitors who 
attend annually. During the past year, we have maintained a most gratifying 
attendance at each of our Shows. Particular mention should be made of our 
recent Spring Show at Mechanics Building where the story of conservation in 
all its phases was told graphically. 

The report of our Executive Secretary, Arno H. Nehrling, enumerates many 
important facts and statistics which I shall not endeavor to present to you. His 
record is comprehensive and complete. 

In closing I wish to express my appreciation to the Trustees for their splendid 
cooperation, to the members of our staff for their loyal devotion and to all who 
have helped the Massachusetts Horticultural Society function successfully for 
the advancement of Horticulture. 

John S. Ames 

President 



10 




A Vista in the Garden of Mrs. H. P. Emery of Worcester. 

Awarded a Silver Medal 



11 



Report of the Secretary 



k s i review our activities for the past year I am impressed with the confidence 
and the faith which our members, both new and old, manifest in us. The 
number of inquiries received in the past 12 months has been amazing. Signifi- 
cantly enough many of these come from new home-owners who ply us with 
questions by mail, telephone and personal visits. How to get the right start in 
planning and planting the home grounds is obviously of paramount interest to 
hundreds of young people in this State. In fact, the inquiries go well beyond the 
bounds of Massachusetts because we have readers of HORTICULTURE in 
every State in the Union. Then, too, foreign correspondents often solicit our aid 
in locating plant material and in the exchange of experiences in growing unusual 
trees and shrubs. It is gratifying, indeed, to know that we can be of help, and 
that we can encourage thousands of people to garden more successfully. 

Another vital phase of our activities is the close contact that the members 
of our staff have with the specialized plant societies, more than a dozen of which 
are housed in our own building and meet here frequently. They seek our as- 
sistance not only for competent speakers but for topics to be discussed and the 
preparation of programs and other specific information. In the same way, we 
render service to garden clubs in all parts of the country. Most clubs start as 
small organizations and often need assistance in conducting their meetings. 
Perhaps the most conspicuous service that we render to garden clubs is the 
annual competition which the magazine HORTICULTURE conducts in the 
presenting of awards for outstanding yearbooks. Last year nearly 300 clubs 
participated and the judges had a most difficult time in selecting the books for 
special awards. Incidentally, this collection is available in our Library and may 
be borrowed by any garden club planning a program for the ensuing year. 

While it is not my duty to report for the Library Committee, I would like 
to mention the fact that occasionally we receive choice gifts which make our 
ever-growing collection more valuable. During the past year our President, 
Mr. Ames, gave us nine beautifully-illustrated volumes on the fruits of France 
and a series of works on the cultivated trees and shrubs of France. Our collec- 
tion was further augmented by Mr. Jan de Graaff of Gresham, Oregon, the 
famous lily hybridizer, who presented us with a collection of historic manu- 
scripts on lilies. These books are accessible in the Library and are worthy of 
inspection. Reporting further on the Library, many groups come to see it and 
study our methods during the course of the year. On January 28th, Miss Manks 
and her staff entertained the Boston Chapter of the Special Libraries Associa- 
tion, consisting of about seventy-five people. December 3rd, the Library School 
of Simmons College also spent an afternoon visiting the Library. In early Octo- 
ber of last year, the Board of Associates of the Garden Club of America held its 
annual meeting in Boston. The Society had the privilege of entertaining this 
group at a tea held in the Trustees Room at Horticultural Hall on the afternoon 
of October 3. The members of this group came from all over the United States 
and many had never had the privilege of visiting Horticultural Hall. 

Mr. Ames, our President, has reported to you on the growth and progress 
of the Society. We are still endeavoring to reach the 15,000 mark in membership 

12 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

and will, I hope, within the next 12 months surpass that goal. Our members 
can help us greatly in sharing the privileges and services of the Society by recom- 
mending new members who are interested in gardening. There are thousands 
of people in the community and in the State who do not know that they may 
become members. In fact, they seem to have the impression that a special in- 
vitation is necessary. It will please your officers greatly if each member makes it 
a point to help their friends and neighbors become better acquainted with the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society and the many services which it renders to 
its members. 

In January of this year, our magazine HORTICULTURE made its ap- 
pearance in a more modern format. After analyzing many publications, over a 
long period of time, our Editor selected a new design for the masthead. In addi- 
tion, we are stressing the fact that HORTICULTURE is America's oldest garden 
magazine and will celebrate its 50th anniversary in 1954. In its earliest form, the 
magazine appeared as a weekly publication. After Mr. Farrington acquired it, 
it appeared twice a month and finally became a monthly publication when 
manufacturing costs made it impossible for the magazine to appear more fre- 
quently. As time passes editorial changes, geared to the interest of our readers, 
will appear in HORTICULTURE. We are constantly adding new subscribers 
to our list and hope to reach the 50,000 mark before the end of the year. Mr. 
Foley, our Editor, deserves much credit for the improvements that have oc- 
curred in our publication. His enthusiasm, energy and willingness to be of 
service is deeply appreciated not only by the members of the staff but by every- 
one with whom he comes in contact. 

In October of last year, Mr. William Littlefield resigned as Advertising 
Manager of HORTICULTURE to accept a position with the magazine Flower 
Grower in New York. It was with regret that we lost Mr. Littlefield. However, 
we are fortunate to have Mr. Richard Husselbee, a graduate of Boston Univer- 
sity, who has had broad training, including special study in the field of law, as 
well as practical experience in the advertising world which gives him a rich 
background for his present position. For some months Mr. Husselbee has con- 
centrated his activities with business firms in the New England area, and he is 
now widening his scope of contact with firms throughout the country. He has 
been an active attendant at the meetings of nurserymen and trade equipment 
suppliers. Furthermore, he has not overlooked the leading Spring Flower Shows 
of the East. Recently he made a tour of the Middle Atlantic States in conjunc- 
tion with the forthcoming Annual Convention of the Men's Garden Clubs of 
America which will convene in Boston the latter part of June. We are fortunate 
indeed to have a representative of our organization with so pleasing a personal- 
ity engaged in the promotion of our magazine HORTICULTURE. 

At this time, I am happy to report that Mr. George Taloumis, the Associate 
Editor of HORTICULTURE, is on a four months leave of absence for study 
in European gardens. Mr. Taloumis plans to visit nurseries, seed and bulb 
farms and some of the leading Spring Flower Shows in order to bring back to 
our readers stimulating information on present day gardening trends on the 
Continent. While he is away Miss Brenda Newton, our Research Librarian, is 
carrying on his duties in an admirable fashion. Miss Newton is notably qualified 

13 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

for this assignment since she has had considerable experience in the research 
field and is a landscape architect whose garden designs have brought her con- 
siderable recognition. 

Horticultural Hall continues to be ever popular as a garden center: in fact, 
it is often difficult for the members of the staff to keep up with all the activities 
in our extensive building. 

The courses in Flower Arrangement conducted under the direction of Mrs. 
Arthur P. Teele of the Boston School of Flower Arrangement continue to gain 
in popularity. Mrs. Teele is an inspiring instructor and holds the attention of 
her pupils at all times. 

The Men's Garden Club of Boston and this Society are sponsoring the Con- 
vention of the Men's Garden Clubs of America scheduled to be held in Boston 
on June 24, 25, 26 and 27. Your President and Secretary, as well as a number 
of the members of the Board, are members of the local Committee. Mr. E. I. 
Farrington, our former Editor and Secretary, is devoting a considerable amount 
of time to this project. His past experiences are of inestimable value to the local 
Club. As co-sponsor of the Convention, the Society will hold open house on 
June 24th which is the opening day of the Convention. The annual June Ex- 
hibition of the Society which was postponed to coincide with the Convention 
will be one of the features of open house. 

Our lecture program during this past year has been unusually successful. 
The Winter Series entitled "Plants and Places Around the World" attracted a 
capacity audience at every lecture. The speakers and their subjects were: 

Jan de Graaff, "Lilies Old and New" 
John Nash Ott, "Flowers the Year 'Round" 
Dr. Richard A. Howard, "South to the Antilles" 
Dr. Donald Wyman, "Present Day British Gardens" 

Our Spring Series has likewise had strong appeal and it is significant that 
each lecture brings many new faces which attest to the great diversity of interest 
among our members and their friends. The six lectures presented were: 

Prof. W. H. Thies, "Through Western Germany with a Color Camera" 

Geoffrey S. Cornish, "10 Steps to a Better Lawn" 

Milford Lawrence, "Landscaping the Home Grounds" 

Dr. R. Milton Carleton, "What's New in Horticulture" 

Mr. G. S. Coffin and Mrs. S. B. Kirkwood, "Mushroom Personalities" 

Daniel J. Foley, "Garden Housekeeping" 

The awarding of medals to distinguished horticulturists is one of the unusual 
privileges afforded this Society. Of special interest is the fact that our most im- 
portant medal, the George Robert White Medal of Honor, for the third time 
since it was established, was awarded to a distinguished European horticulturist 
and botanist. It was awarded to Sir William Wright Smith, Professor of Botany 
at the University of Edinburgh and Director of the famous Royal Botanic 
Garden of Edinburgh, Scotland. For more than forty years, he has been asso- 
ciated with this great Botanical Garden and through his evaluation of exotics 

14 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

his reputation in the field of horticulture and botany is unrivalled. He has had 
many other honors such as the Victoria and Veitch Medals of the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society. An Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, Sir William Wright Smith is no stranger to our shores. On a number 
of occasions, he has served as a judge at the Spring Flower Shows of the Society. 

For skill in the science and practice of hybridization and the propagation 
of hardy plants, the Jackson Dawson Medal of the Society was awarded to Dr. 
Walter E. Lammerts of La Canada, California. Dr. Lammerts is interested in 
the breeding of both fruits and flowers having developed a number of new peach 
varieties, but he is best known for having developed 5 All-America rose varieties. 

The Thomas Roland Medal for skill in horticulture was awarded to Prof. 
Alex Laurie, head of the Department of Floriculture at Ohio State University. 
Prof. Laurie is one of the best known educators in the field of horticulture and 
commercial floriculture. He has pioneered many of the new methods of culture 
used under glass by commercial florists. He has also written a number of text 
books in this highly specialized field. 

The Society also awarded two large Gold Medals to specialists in widely- 
different fields. Dr. Donald Forsha Jones of the Connecticut Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station was honored for his outstanding work in breeding and hy- 
bridizing corn. Mrs. Beatrix Farrand of Bar Harbor, Maine was recognized as 
a distinguished landscape architect responsible for the development of college 
campuses in many parts of the United States. Her garden at Bar Harbor has 
become a mecca for those interested in unusual plant material. 

The Committee on Gardens, of which Mr. Oliver Wolcott is the Chairman, 
also made a number of important awards. They visited many gardens during 
the Summer, and after careful deliberation, made the following awards: 

The Gold Medal of the Society to Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Danielson of Groton 
for their estate with rolling lawns amid great trees — commanding from a ridge, 
a wide sweep of hills. A small formal garden; a retaining wall planted with 
alpines; a well-designed cutting garden, are features so placed as not to interfere 
with the broad line. A swimming pool edged with lawn set in an oval of trees 
and shrubs opens on the same superb view. An example of how nature can be 
enhanced by horticulture. 

The Society's Gold Medal was also awarded to Mrs. Aldus Higgins of 
Worcester for an estate with walls and yew hedges enclosing gardens of intimate 
charm, an upward -stretching vista of turf between herbaceous borders, sloping 
lawns, and fine trees make a beautiful setting in perfect proportion for the hand- 
some Tudor house. 

The Society's Silver Medal was awarded to Mrs. H. P. Emery of Worcester 
for a place of old-fashioned charm where rambling walks lead along a pond; 
to a slope of superb laurel, and down the outlet brook, all planted with taste 
and great horticultural success. Notable are the cutting garden, a sunken garden 
in part of the foundation of an old barn with a pergola covered with vines, the 
interesting assortment of ground covers, and above all the evidence of years of 
love by a born horticulturist. 

A Society Bronze Medal was awarded to Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Johnson 

15 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

of Andover for their attractive place stretching back from the village street to 
which superb, ancient trees, well-placed shrubs and the rolling slopes of the 
lawn give an atmosphere of remoteness and space. 

The Garden Committee also awarded a Garden Certificate to the Sylvania 
Electric Products, Inc., of Salem, for the planting of trees and shrubs at its 
Loring Avenue plant in Salem that surrounds a factory with greenery and 
bloom. A proof that efficiency can be joined with beauty. 

In 1929 Albert C. Burrage, Sr., left the Society $1250, the income to be 
used annually for the purchase of a Gold Medal to be awarded for a newly-made 
porch overlooking a garden. This Medal has not been awarded for a number 
of years because new homes are now seldom built with porches. At a meeting 
of the Board of Trustees, held last year, the Board voted to broaden the scope 
of the deed of gift to include a terrace, veranda or other addition to a home 
overlooking a garden. Since the awarding of this Medal had been under dis- 
cussion for some time, President Ames had appointed a new Burrage Porch 
Fund Committee consisting of Mr. Albert C. Burrage, Jr., Chairman, Mr. 
Oliver Wolcott and Mr. George W. Butterworth. The Committee reported at 
a meeting of the Board of Trustees held on December 11, 1951, and recom- 
mended that the Albert Cameron Burrage Porch Fund Medal for 1951 be 
awarded to Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Ross, Hingham, for an unusual terrace 
developed in conjunction with an informal group of roses and an old wisteria 
vine. The design of the terrace is well balanced, pleasing and restful. Unusual 
skill has been used in locating a pleasant outdoor living room which on one side 
overlooks a steep hillside containing a wide variety of plants and on the other 
a small, well-designed formal garden. 

This report contains only a brief resume of some of our activities. Other 
important work of the Society will be covered by the Chairmen of special com- 
mittees. I know you will enjoy reading their reports. 

In closing, I wish to again express my heartiest thanks for the loyal support 
I have received from the Officers and Trustees as well as the Chairmen of the 
various committees. I would also like to express my deep appreciation to the 
members of the staff for their loyalty and interest. I hope it may be my privilege 
to enjoy the same support and cooperation in the future. 

Arno H. Nehrling 

Executive Secretary 



16 




Photo: GENEREUX 



A Vista in a Naturalistic, Oriental Garden by Breck's. 
Awarded a Gold Medal, Harvest Show 1951 



17 



Report Of The Committee On Exhibitions 

Under the direction of this Committee eight shows were held: Daffodil, 
Tulip, June, Children's, Harvest, Chrysanthemum, Camellia and Spring 
Show. All the Shows, with the exception of the Spring Show, were held at 
Horticultural Hall, and all are free to the public except the Spring Show and 
the Chrysanthemum Show. 

The total attendance at all the Shows this year was 143,029. This does not 
include the 3,590 who attended the Gladiolus Show, in which the Society joins 
with the New England Gladiolus Society, making a grand total of 146,619. 
The attendance at this year's Spring Show totaled 120,894 as compared to 
109,890 in 1951 — a gain of 11,004 this year. 

This was the second year the basement of Mechanics Building was open to 
exhibitors as well as to trade space. The Middlesex County Beekeepers set up 
an extensive display there occupying more space than in former years. The 
school exhibits were also in the basement. Although the Spring Show was early 
this year, the weather was good with only one rainy day. 

A few of the leading exhibitors at the Spring Flower Show this year in Grand 
Hall included: the Massachusetts Department of Conservation, Cherry Hill 
Nurseries, Alexander I. Heimlich and Bay State Nurseries. Other outstanding 
exhibits included the famous Stone acacias. Orchids were featured by Mrs. 
Edwin S. Webster, Richard C. Paine, the Dane Estate and Butterworth's. 
The Gardner Museum showed cinerarias. A begonia garden staged by Welles- 
ley College, Botany Department, a cactus garden by F. I. Carter & Sons, and 
distinctive plantings by Weston Nurseries, the Gardeners' and Florists' Club 
of Boston and the National Association of Gardeners, both the Boston and 
Newport Branches, contributed to the success of the Show. 

From a financial standpoint, the results of the Spring Show were encourag- 
ing in that we are now able to recover, somewhat, from a deficit incurred last 
year, and will be in a position to project our free shows this year on a high level 
of dignity and excellence. 

Ray M. Koon, Acting Chairman 

Committee on Exhibitions 



18 



piSgil 








Photo: GKNERKUX 



Begonia, Dora Swisher selected as the best begonia specimen 
at the 1951 Harvest Show 



19 




Photo: GENEREUX 



Sylvania Electric Products, Inc., Salem, Massachusetts. 
Awarded a Garden Certificate for an industrial planting 




Photo: CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR 

Prize Winners, Exhibition of Products of Childrens Gardens 1951 

20 



Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 

The 1951 Children's Show was nearer to perfection than any Children's 
Show in the past twenty-five or thirty years. These young gardeners and 
exhibitors, the adult exhibitors of tomorrow, displayed both skill and showman- 
ship in the quality of produce shown and the manner in which it was exhibited. 

There were 1023 exhibits in the Home and School Garden section and 375 
in the 4-H Club section, making a total of 1398 individual exhibits. This is only 
a little more than 100 exhibits less than the great 1945 Show of the Victory 
Garden era when it was everyone's patriotic duty to have a garden. With 100 
less exhibits, there was opportunity for ample table space so that each exhibit 
was shown to its best advantage. 

The individual vegetable and flower classes had many entries. Notable 
among these was the class for six green tomatoes which had 87 entries by actual 
count. The class featuring a collection of flowers from a child's garden had 72 
entries. With many entries in all classes and excellent quality as well, the judges 
had a difficult job on their hands to pick the first prize plate or exhibit. As proof 
of this, let me say that the group of experienced, long time judges of the Society 
assigned to the school garden exhibits required three hours for five classes. 

The large school garden on the Cummings Estate in Woburn, operated by 
the Boston School Department, in cooperation with the Park Department, as 
usual, had an outstanding display and many prize-winning, individual entries. 
The large display was of such fine quality that the judges not only awarded it 
first prize in its class but also the Silver Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society for the fourth successive year. "Any adult professional exhibitor could be 
proud of an exhibit like the one from the Woburn Garden", said Ernest Borow- 
ski, Chairman of the Committee on prizes, and one of the judges at this Show. 

Mrs. Henry D. Tudor, a member of the Children's Show Committee, who 
has a particular interest in the children who participate in the Woburn Garden, 
has again donated $350.00 for a Milk Fund to be used for the purchase of milk 
for the children attending the garden during the 1952 garden season. 

The Park Department has finished the erection of a permanent Field House 
on the Cummings Estate with proper sanitary facilities for both children and 
staff. The new well has been deepened sufficiently so that there is now available 
for all uses an ample supply of water. Proper sanitary facilities and ample water 
have been sorely needed for over ten years. 

Year by year, attendance has increased at this Show and now there is a 
steady flow of spectators during the hours that the Show is open to the public. 

The 4-H Club Exhibit in the upper hall, under the able direction of Mr. 
Earle H. Nodine, Assistant State Club Leader, filled the hall. Quality was ex- 
cellent, competition keen, and staging was superior. It was a credit to 4-H Club 
boys and girls of the Commonwealth and their leaders. 

As a member of the Committee presenting this report on the Children's 
Garden Exhibit for 1951, I wish to take this opportunity to thank the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society for its helpful interest and genuine assistance to 
the School Garden movement. 

Daniel W. O'Brien 
The Committee on Children's Gardens 

21 




A Vista in the Garden of Mrs. Aldus Higgins, Worcester. 

Awarded a Gold Medal 



22 



Report of the Committee on Prizes 

I take pleasure in presenting to you my second annual report of the Com- 
mittee on Prizes. Another year has passed and I am sure that some progress 
has been made. It is the constant aim of this Committee to put the judging on 
a higher plane and to fulfill its functions without fear or favor, both to this So- 
ciety and to the exhibitors who make our shows possible. I am sure you will be 
interested in knowing how these shows are judged and what a judge sees. We 
do not all see things alike; usually we see those things that interest or please us. 
If I attend a meeting or social gathering alone, my wife asks, "was so and so 
there?" If I say yes, she invariably inquires; "what did she wear and what was 
her hat like?" I never know, but if we visit someone's garden or greenhouse she 
reminds me; "you never miss a thing." "If there is a bug on the place or a sick 
plant you are sure to see it." And so it is that a judge sees not only the exhibit 
before him but also many things in the background. To mention but a few — 
the first thing an exhibitor has to do is select and gather together his material. 
Then at the proper time it must be brought into the greenhouse to force. If he 
has a dozen different items, the chances are that each one requires perhaps 
different treatment so that they will all be in bloom together. No two seasons 
are alike; some Winters have plenty of sunshine and others are cloudy. Also 
the shows are not always on the same dates each year. Now, if after all this, the 
exhibitor is successful in getting his material in good condition for the time, he 
still has a big hurdle to overcome. He has to transport it to the hall and set it 
up, but none of these things the average person sees. To one a beautiful sunset 
is but a daub of color in the sky; but to the person inspired with thought, it is 
the work of a master hand, and so it shows again that we all see things differently. 

"A primrose by the river's brim, 
A yellow primrose was to him, 
And nothing more." 

There has been some criticism that the recent Spring Show lacked color and 
yet there is no lack of color in the New England landscape. The red and orange 
bloom of the swamp maples, the bright lemon coloring of the poplars, and the 
delicate lacy foliage of the graceful birches against a background of cedars pro- 
vide both beauty and color. Not the flaming colors of oriental azaleas or acacias 
from far off Australia, but delicate and lovely nevertheless. It may appear that 
some of the foregoing is irrelevant and yet a bare report of the activities of this 
Committee might prove to be rather dull and uninteresting. 

At the smaller shows the Committee does all the judging but at the larger 
shows this, of course, would be impossible, so the Society maintains a list of 
competent judges from which this Committee selects for the larger shows. 

In closing I would like to thank the other members of the Committee for 
their fine cooperation and faithful attendance. 

Ernest Borowski, Chairman 
Thomas Milne, Co-Chairman 

Committee on Prizes 

23 




Photos: GENEREUX 

A Vista in the Garden of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Danielson, Groton. 

Awarded a Gold Medal 




Superb Ancient Trees frame the home of Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell 
Johnson of Andover. Awarded a Bronze Medal 

24 



GARDEN COMMITTEE AWARDS 

The Board of Trustees awarded the following medals on the recommendation of the 
Committee on Gardens, Oliver Wolcott, chairman. 

The Society s Gold Medal: 

To Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Danielson, Groton, where rolling lawns amid great 
trees command from a ridge a wide sweep of hills. A small formal garden; a 
retaining wall planted with alpines; a well-designed cutting garden, are features 
so placed as not to interfere with the broad line. A swimming pool edged with 
lawn set in an oval of trees and shrubs opens on the same superb view. An 
example of how nature can be enhanced by horticulture. 

The Society s Gold Medal: 

To Mrs. Aldus Higgins, Worcester, where walls and yew hedges enclosing 
gardens of intimate charm, an upward — stretching vista of turf between 
herbaceous borders, sloping lawns, and fine trees make a beautiful setting in 
perfect proportion for the handsome Tudor house. 

The Society s Silver Medal: 

To Mrs. H. P. Emery, Worcester, for a place of old-fashioned charm where 
rambling walks lead along a pond, to a slope of superb laurel, and down the 
outlet brook, all planted with taste and great horticultural success. Notable 
are the cutting garden, a sunken garden in part of the foundation of an old barn 
with a pergola covered with vines, the interesting assortment of ground covers, 
and above all the evidence of years of love by a born horticulturist. 

The Society s Bronze Medal: 

To Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Johnson, Andover, for their attractive place 
stretching back from the village street to which superb ancient trees, well placed 
shrubs and the rolling slopes of the lawn give an atmosphere of remoteness and 
space. 

The Society s Albert C. Burr age Porch Fund Medal: 

The Albert C. Burrage Porch Fund Medal: To Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. 
Ross of Hingham, for an unusual terrace developed in conjunction with an in- 
formal group of roses and an old wisteria vine. The design of the terrace is well 
balanced, pleasing and restful. Unusual skill has been used in locating a pleasant 
outdoor living room which on one side overlooks a steep hillside containing 
plants of a wide variety and on the other a small, well-designed formal garden. 

The Society s Garden Certificate: 

To Sylvania Electric Products, Inc., 60 Boston Street, Salem, for a planting 
of trees and shrubs at its Loring Avenue plant in Salem that surrounds a factory 
with greenery and bloom. A proof that efficiency can be joined with beauty. 

25 




Grounds of Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Ross, Hingham. View of 
the area before the terrace was constructed. 




PhotOS: GENEREUX 



Terrace developed in conjunction with an informal group of 
roses and an old wisteria vine. Awarded the Albert C. Burrage 

Porch Fund Medal 

26 



Report of the Library Committee 

at the end of 1951 there were 30,902 volumes in the library of which 513 
l\. were added before the end of December, 1951; somewhat more than 160 
volumes have been added since that date. These include purchases, gifts, and 
bound volumes of current serials. Thus the increase in the library holdings has 
been normal. Yet this large annual increase in the number of bound volumes 
in a specialized library raises certain problems because the available shelf room is 
limited. Sooner or later the problem of extra space for the expanding library will 
have to be faced, but fortunately there is, on the third floor of Horticultural Hall, 
room where new stacks may be placed, to take care of seldom-consulted books. 

Other activities of the library compare very favorably with those of recent 
years; increases in demands and services are the rule rather than the exception. 
Volumes borrowed by members were 5643 up to the end of December, while 
from January 1 to April 15 of this year 2232 additional books were loaned. In 
this same period 2642 packages of books were mailed to out-of-town members, 
some, of course, on inter-library loans. All who request this out-of-town service 
cover transportation costs. 

The booklet, Four Hundred Books for Amateur Gardeners is revised an- 
nually, and copies are sent to all new members. Copies are available to older 
members of the Society on request. Book reviews have been prepared for 
HORTICULTURE. 

The reading room has been kept open in the early evening on all days when 
lectures have been delivered in the building. Exhibits of interest to members 
and to special groups have been maintained in the reading room show cases, 
these being changed at intervals. Book tables stressing current and otherwise 
interesting horticultural literature have been maintained at meetings of affili- 
ated and other societies. As usual, the information booth at the Spring Show 
was largely staffed by the library group. The special 1951 collection of Garden 
Club yearbooks is now on tour, but our members, as well as Garden Club offi- 
cials, are reminded that we maintain an excellent reserve stock of these items 
which are always available to them. Special exhibits are planned for the meet- 
ings of the Men's Garden Club of America and Herb Society of America, the 
annual meetings of both organizations to be held in Boston in June. The cor- 
respondence on matters horticultural is large in addition to the current library 
correspondence, and the tendency for it to increase year after year is evident. 

During the year adjustments have had to be made to meet current Horti- 
cultural Society problems. Thus Miss Newton's services were required, shortly 
after her return from six months absence due to illness, to take over the editorial 
duties of Mr. Taloumis during the latter's absence in Europe. This meant the 
employment of temporary assistants in the library which always involves a 
certain amount of training. It is evident, however, that the library well fulfilled 
its normal functions, in spite of interruptions, during the year. 

The problem of recataloguing the library, which has been in progress for nine 
years, for a part of this long period on a part-time basis, is unfortunately still 
with us. I say unfortunately because in the interim costs have very greatly in- 
creased. Volumes processed in the year ending December 31 were 1819 and 

(See page 30) 

27 




1952 Spring Show 

A small, Gape God cottage with a color- 
ful dooryard garden in a setting of 
typical seaside plants, arranged against 
a seascape attracted wide attention in 
Grand Hall. This realistic panorama 
was carried out with amazing skill, and 
no detail seemed to be lacking, except 
the salt spray. It was designed and 
planted under the supervision of Harold 
Stevenson by Bay State Nurseries. 

Perhaps never before, at any Flower 
Show staged by the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society, have so many 
natural plantings been exhibited. The 
story of conservation, its importance to 
our pleasure and our way of life was 
never so graphically presented. It was 
not so much a Show featuring spectacu- 
lar color, as it was an exhibition and an 
interpretation of the varied landscape 
that is an enviable part of our heritage. 




Springtime in New England was the theme of the Society's 81st 
great Spring Flower Show. Visitors will long remember Grand Hall 
with its hillside plantings, ledge outcroppings and its vistas to the sea. 
The Massachusetts Department of Conservation, under the direction 
of Egbert Hans, Cherry Hill Nurseries, Bay State Nurseries and 
Alexander I. Heimlich did a masterful piece of work in their inter- 
pretation of the varied landscape of New England. 

In the series of gardens planned under the direction of the Wom- 
en's Exhibition Committee, there were many practical suggestions 
for growing plants on different levels. An amazing variety of material 
was used and arranged with skill and taste. 

A new variety of the familiar red geranium, pleasingly arranged, 
as reflected in the picture below, caught the eyes of thousands of 
visitors who flocked into Mechanics Building during the entire week. 
This exhibit, staged by the Junior League Garden Club was awarded 
the Mrs. John S. Ames Cup and the Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup. 




Photos: GENERKUX 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

256 have been finished since that date. What still remains to be recatalogued 
consists of about half the books in the trustees' room, these mostly old and rare 
volumes, and all of the sets of periodicals. Thus at last the recataloging sup- 
posedly approaches its end for we are assured, once a periodical be placed in its 
proper category, that normally it will be necessary to prepare only one new 
card, no matter whether the run contains two or two hundred volumes. 

As we come to a consideration of the very numerous sets of periodicals we 
face other problems. There are many complete or partial sets of strictly agri- 
cultural serials, and others in cognate fields, that contain no horticultural data, 
or at least very little that would be so classified. These runs may consist of one 
or two volumes, or parts of volumes, to as many as sixty or more. Because of the 
now crowded condition of the main library and lack of shelf space for expansion, 
we face the problem of the possible selection and disposal of some of these non- 
horticultural sets. The matter has been considered in only a preliminary man- 
ner, but a list of these marginal serials has been prepared. Of necessity much 
study must be devoted to the subject, and if the committee ultimately decides 
that certain items should be eliminated, we feel that final authority to act is 
vested in the Board of Trustees. The situation is very clear in reference to some 
serials, no volume of which is ever consulted, and which have no place in a 
horticultural library. 

Yet it must be remembered that all of our serials are listed in the Union List 
of Periodicals and accordingly there may occasionally be a request for the loan 
of this or that volume. Thus it is that all sets which may be considered for pos- 
sible elimination must be checked on the holdings of other libraries in the Boston 
area. A little random sampling has already disclosed the fact that, in reference 
to our file of a New South Wales agricultural periodical, there are as many as 
four complete or partial sets in other libraries in the community; and there is 
little or no horticulture in the entire series. In another case, a technical Amer- 
ican serial of nearly 70 volumes containing not a single horticultural paper and 
few botanical ones, there are still eight sets in other Boston libraries in spite of 
the disposal of the American Academy and the Natural History Museum sets 
in the past decade when their libraries were sold. There is little or no reason to 
believe that any volume of this serial has ever been consulted in our library. 

Clearly in this type of periodical literature, low prices, not high ones, are 
involved, if any be offered for sale; and for such material there will be very little 
demand. It is not impossible that the solution of difficulties here would be rental 
of shelf space in the New England Deposit Library, the cost of which is nominal. 
Judging from past experience, provided authorization be eventually granted 
to dispose of certain items, the addition of another member to the relatively- 
large library staff will be requested. I suspect that the cost of checking our 
marginal holdings, for more than 700 titles are involved, and preparing the 
necessary list of unwanted serials might cost considerably more than would be 
realized from possible sales; and the total cost of the operation would suffice to 
cover shelf rental in the Deposit Library for many, many years. We might find 
ourselves in a situation paralleling the recataloging project which was so lightly 
approved a decade ago with no anticipation that it would take more than ten 
years to complete the task and at a cost per volume which I have not attempted 

30 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

to estimate. I have presented these few data merely to indicate that the task of 
deciding what should be done, in a case like this, is by no means a simple one. 
I was absent from the United States for more than half of the year 1951, and 
from mid-January to mid-March of this year. When meetings of the Committee 
were desirable, the librarian issued the call, and the other members took over. 
I tried to persuade Mrs. Crosby to prepare and present this report, but here I 
was not as successful as with Mr. Koon, who has prepared and presented the 
excellent report of the Exhibitions Committee. My plea was on the basis that 
Mrs. Crosby was much more familiar than was I with the proceedings in my 
absence. She gently declined the honor, so I have done the best that I could 
under the circumstances. I am under obligations to other members of the 
Committee who carried on during my absence. 

E. D. Merrill, Chairman 

Committee on Library 




Photo: MILTON SILVIA 



A View of the Cactus Garden designed by F. I. Carter & Sons, 
Tewksbury. Awarded the Sarah Todd Bulkley Medal of The Gar- 
den Club of America at the New England Spring Flower Show 1 952 

31 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1951 
The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Ames, North Easton, for the most outstanding exhibit 
in 1951. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Sir William Wright Smith, Edinburgh, Scotland, for eminent service in 
horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Alex Laurie, Columbus, Ohio, for his outstanding research in the field of 
horticulture. 

Jackson Dawson Medal 

Dr. Walter E. Lammerts, La Canada, California, for his success in hybridizing 

roses. 

Albert C. Burrage Porch Fund Medal 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Ross, Hingham, for an unusual terrace developed in 
conjunction with an informal group of roses and an old wisteria vine. 

Gold Medals of The 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Danielson, Groton, for an estate of unusual charm and 

beauty. 
Mrs. Beatrix Farrand, Bar Harbor, Maine, for her outstanding work in the field 

of landscape architecture. 
Mrs. Aldus Higgins, Worcester, for a garden of intimate charm. 
Dr. Donald Forsha Jones, New Haven, Conn., for his outstanding work in 

hybridizing corn. 

Silver Medal of The 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mrs. H. P. Emery, Worcester, for a garden of old-fashioned charm and beauty. 

Bronze Medal of The 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Johnson, Andover, for an attractive, well-planted 
garden. 

Garden Certificate of The 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Sylvania Electric Products, Inc., Salem, for a planting of trees and shrubs at its 
Loring Avenue plant. 

PRESIDENT'S CUP 

Jackson & Perkins Co., Newark, New York, for two rose gardens at the Spring 
Show. 

32 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1951 

Gold Medal of The 
Horticultural Society of New York 

Breck's, Boston, for a Spring garden at the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of The 

Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Ames, North Easton, for a formal azalea garden at the 
Spring Show. 

George Holliday Memorial Prize 

James Hurley, Chestnut Hill, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

Auburndale Garden Club, for a side door exhibit at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 

Cambridge Plant Club, for the exhibit in the Garden Club section, which dis- 
played the greatest horticultural excellence at the Spring Show. 

The Antoine Leuthy Gold Medal 

L. Sherman Adams Co., Wellesley, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Trophy of The 
Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., North Abington, for an informal garden at the 
Spring Show. 

Sarah Todd Bulkley Medal of The 
Garden Club of America 

Women's Exhibitions Committee of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 
(Mrs. H. H. Richards, Chairman) for backyard gardens and the demonstra- 
tion of composting at the Spring Show. 

John Taylor Arms Award 

Mrs. George E. Taylor, Marblehead, for a flower arrangement at the Spring 
Show. 

Book: "Shrubs and Vines for American Gardens" 

Mrs. Theodore E. Brown, Milton, for Camellia gigantea. 

Crystal Vases 

First Church of Christ Scientist, Boston, for tulip Indian Chief, best bloom in 

the Show. 
The Merrys, Needham, for daffodil Duke of Windsor, best bloom in the Show. 

The President Ames Trophy of The 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

L. Sherman Adams Co., Wellesley, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

The President Bonham Trophy of The 
American Orchid Society 

C. J. Van Bourgondien, Inc., Babylon, L. I., New York, for a group of cymbi- 
diums at the Spring Show. (See page 36) 

33 




Sir William Wright Smith 

Awarded George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Career of Accomplishment In the Plant World 

Sir William wright smith, Regius Professor of Botany, University of Edin- 
burgh and Director of the Royal Botanic Garden was born in Scotland, 
February 2, 1875 and was educated at the University of Edinburgh. 

At an early age he was appointed to the staff of the Royal Botanic Garden 
at Calcutta, which enabled him to take a personal part in the surveys of N. W. 
Sikkim, the Tibetan-Nepalese frontier and the Sikkim-Chambi frontier, which 
led him to an intensive study of the Himalayan flora and later to those of 
Upper Burma, Yunnan and Szechuan. In 1911 he was made Assistant Keeper 
at the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh. When Dr. Balfour retired in 1922, he 
was selected to succeed to the present positions which he has filled with dis- 
tinction. In 1922 he was also knighted. 

The outstanding position that the Royal Botanic Garden at Edinburgh has 
attained, both in horticulture and in botany is largely due to his leadership. 

34 



ACCOMPLISHMENT IN THE PLANT WORLD 

Here was received and distributed the enormous Forrest Chinese collections 
of plants and seeds, a part of the Kingdon Ward collections, and a part of the 
J. F. Rock collections. Other collections included the outstanding Ludlow and 
Sheriff recent ones from Tibet. The many thousands of seedlings of hundreds 
of species of rhododendron, primula, lilium, nemocharis, paeonia, meconopsis 
and other plants that have been grown and distributed from Edinburgh have 
vastly increased our wealth of ornamental and useful plants. It was a fortunate 
combination of circumstances that the Edinburgh climatic conditions were 
favorable to the growth of Himalayan and Southwestern Chinese species, and 
at the same time a Director, in the person of Sir William Wright Smith, was in 
charge who realized the potentialities. It is to Sir William that much of the 
success of the Edinburgh institution has been due in the past thirty years. 

In horticulture he has been recognized by having been awarded the Vic- 
toria and the Vietch medals of honor of the Royal Horticultural Society, and in 
botany by his election as a member of various important societies at home and 
even here in Boston as an honorary member of the American Academy of Arts 
and Sciences, the second oldest of organizations in America corresponding to 
the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Linnean Society of London and others. In 
conferring the George Robert White Medal of Honor on Sir William Wright 
Smith, who, incidentally, on occasion has judged at our Spring Shows, the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society has honored itself as well. 




Photo: GENEREUX 



An Arrangement of Camellias by Butler & Ullman, Inc., 
Northampton, at the Camellia Show 

35 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1951 

The Vice-Presidents and Treasurer Trophy 
of The American Orchid Society 

John S. Ames, North Easton, for Cymbidium White Queen var. Phryne, at the 
Spring Show. 

The Honorary Vice-Presidents Trophy 
of The American Orchid Society 

Ralph Kiesewetter, Roslyn, New York, for Laeliocattleya Joseph Hampton, at 
the Spring Show. 

The Trustees Trophy of The 
American Orchid Society 

H. Patterson & Son, Bergenfield, N. J., for a display of orchids at the Spring 
Show. 

The Affiliated Societies Trophy 
of The American Orchid Society 

C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, L. I., New York, for a display of cymbidiums 
at the Spring Show. 

L. Sherman Adams Special 

Hawaii Orchid Society, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

The American Orchid Society Trophy 

L. Sherman Adams Co., Wellesley, for the most meritorious orchid exhibit at 
the Spring Show. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
Special Orchid Award 

Andrew Benson, Maywood, Illinois, for a display of Phaelanopsis at the Spring 
Show. 

New England Gladiolus Society 
32 nd Anniversary Prize 

An illuminated scroll awarded by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society to 
Albert Flory, Lowell, for gladiolus variety Noweta Rose. 

Gold Medals 

L. Sherman Adams Co., for an informal garden of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Mr. and Mrs. John S. Ames, for a formal azalea garden at the Spring Show. 
Associated Fruit Growers of Eastern Massachusetts, for a display of fruits and 

vegetables. 
Boston School of Flower Arrangement (Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Director), for an 

exhibit of Thanksgiving and Christmas decorations. 
Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Breck's, for a display of garden chrysanthemums. 
Breck's, for a display of daffodils. 
Breck's, for a naturalistic, oriental garden. 
Breck's, for a Spring garden at the Spring Show. 
Breck's, for a display of tulips. 

36 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1951 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of camellias. 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., for cultural perfection of roses at the Spring Show. 

F. I. Carter & Sons, for an exhibit of cacti and succulents at the Spring Show. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for the combined displays of peonies. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dane, for a group of odontoglossums at the Spring Show. 

Flying Cloud Farms, Inc., for the most meritorious exhibit in the Gladiolus 

Show. 
The Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, (Co-chairmen, Mrs. Chester 
Cook and Mrs. Samuel B. Kirkwood), for flower arrangements based on the 
theme "Our Natural Resources" at the Spring Show. 
Gardeners' and Florists' Club of Boston, for an exhibit of chrysanthemums in an 

oriental, naturalistic setting. 
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, for a group of cyclamen at the Spring 

Show. 
Alexander I. Heimlich, for a wall garden at the Spring Show. 
Hill Floral Products Co., Richmond, Indiana, for Happiness Rose at the Spring 

Show. 
Jackson & Perkins Co., Newark, N. Y., for two rose gardens at the Spring Show. 
Massachusetts Department of Conservation, for a typical State Park at the 
j Spring Show. 

The Merrys, for a display of chrysanthemums. 
New York Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, N. Y., for a display of 

fruits. 
Mjr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for an exhibit of acacias at the Spring Show. 
Turner Bros. Nursery, West Long Branch, N. J., (at New York), for the best 

commercial garden in the Show. 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Wissahickon Garden Club (at Philadelphia), for the most outstanding garden 

in the Show. 
The Women's Exhibitions Committee of the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society, (Mrs. Henry H. Richards, chairman) for featuring dogwood walks 
through Spring gardens and demonstrating how backyards may be charming 
as well as useful, at the Spring Show. 

Silver Medals 

Bartlett Gardens, for a feature garden at the Spring Show. 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Boston School Garden, Woburn, for the largest and best display of vegetables 

and flowers from a school garden. 
Brightridge Dairy Greenhouses, Providence, R. I., for a rose garden at the 

Spring Show. 
Frost & Higgins Co., for a modern garden at the Spring Show. 
Gardeners' & Florists' Club of Boston, for a display of fruits, flowers and 

vegetables. 
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, for a group of chrysanthemums in an 

oriental manner. (See page 40) 

37 




Mrs. Beatrix Farrand, Landscape Architect 

A Large GOLD MEDAL of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was 
awarded to Mrs. Beatrix Farrand of Bar Harbor, Maine. Distinguished inter- 
preter of the landscape, Mrs. Farrand has left her imprint on many college 
campuses all over America. A student of the illustrious Charles Sprague Sargent 
of the Arnold Arboretum, Mrs. Farrand pioneered in a profession which few 
women had approached. Both Yale University and Smith College have be- 
stowed honorary degrees on her, and the Trustees of the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society are happy to add to her laurels, and to compliment her for the 
collection of plants she has assembled in her Reef Point garden at Bar Harbor. 

38 



The JACKSON DAWSON MEDAL 
for skill in the science and practice of 
hybridization and propagation of hardy 
plants was awarded to Dr. Walter E. 
Lammerts, La Canada, California. Plant 
breeder whose interests have embraced 
both fruits and flowers, Dr. Lammerts 
has developed new peach varieties and 
several roses which have received All- 
America awards. 

The THOMAS ROLAND MEDAL for 
skill in horticulture was awarded to Alex 
Laurie, head of the department of flori- 
culture at Ohio State University. Orig- 
inator of new practices in commercial 
floriculture, author of numerous text- 
books and as progressive educator, 
Professor Laurie well merits the recog- 
nition which The Thomas Roland 
Medal brings. 

Large GOLD MEDAL of the Massachu- 
setts Horticultural Society was awarded 
to Dr. Donald Forsha Jones, head of the 
department of genetics, Connecticut 
Agricultural Experiment Station for his 
outstanding work in hybridizing corn. 
His research and contributions in agri- 
culture have been most noteworthy. Our 
Society deems it a pleasure to honor an 
agricultural scholar in a nearby state. 




Prof. Alex Laurie 

Awards of 
Committee on Special Medals 

See also pages 34, 38 




Dr. Walter E. Lammerts 



Dr. Donald F. Jones 



39 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1951 

W. C. Horsford, Charlotte, Vt., (at the North American Lily Society Show) 

for a collection of six lily species, Commercial. 
R. Kiesewetter, Roslyn, New York, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Lexington Nurseries, Inc., for a formal garden at the Spring Show. 
Dunbar Lockwood, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 
C. H. Lothrop, for a display of double snapdragons at the Spring Show. 
Middlesex County Beekeepers Association, for an educational exhibit of Italian 

honey bees at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. William H. Moore (at Manchester), for an outstanding display of foliage 

plants. 
National Association of Gardeners (Boston Branch), for a display of fruits, 

flowers and vegetables. 
National Association of Gardeners (Newport Branch), for a display of chrysan- 
themums. 
National Association of Gardeners (Newport Branch), for an informal garden at 

the Spring Show. 
Northern Nut Growers Association, for a collection of nuts. 
Norumbega Nursery, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Miss Elynor O'Neil, for a display of miniature roses at the Spring Show. 
Richard C. Paine, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Richard C. Paine, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 
R. D. Rappleye, College Park, Md., (at the North American Lily Society Show) 

for a collection of six lily species, Amateur. 
A. D. Rothman, Rhienbeck, New York, (at the North American Lily Society 

Show), for the best named hybrid of Lilium testaceum. 
Waltham Field Station, for a display of tulips. 
Weston Nurseries, Inc., for a display of flowering shrubs and trees. 

Bronze Medals 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, for a group of cinerarias. 

Mrs. Sidney Hoffman, Jr., for white rose arrangements at the Spring Show. 

Leavitt Gardens, for rose arrangements at the Spring Show. 

G. H. Rounds, for a display of strawberries. 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

First Class Certificates 

Begonia White Exquisite, exhibited by the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. 
Carnation Petersen's Pink Sim, exhibited by E. A. Petersen, at the Spring Show. 
Rose Havana, exhibited by Arnold-Fisher Co. 

Awards of Merit 

Apple Monroe, exhibited by New York Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Gladiolus Red Head, exhibited by C. J. Vincent. 

Grape Steuben, exhibited by New York Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Peony Samoset, exhibited by Harold W. Copeland. 

Rhododendron giganteum, exhibited by Weston Nurseries, Inc. at the Spring 

Show. 
Rhododendron Tally Ho, exhibited by Walter Hunnewell. 

40 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1951 

Votes of Commendation 

Camellia Magnoliaeflora, exhibited by Mrs. Theodore E. Brown. 
Clematis, Clark's Corsage, exhibited by Dr. George O. Clark. 
Ligustrum folletti, exhibited by Stephen Follett. 
Tulip Smiling Queen, exhibited by Harold S. Ross. 

Cultural Certificates 

Andrew Benson, for a display of phaelanopsis at the Spring Show. 

Breck's, for a display of daffodils. 

Robert G. Chamberlain, for Cymbidium White Queen var. Phryne, at the 

Spring Show. 
Edgewood Greenhouses, for Sedum morganianum. 
George Hewitt, for stocks at the Spring Show. 
Kenneth W. Houghton, for double pyrethrum Lady Phyllis. 
Mrs. Anna S. Nelson, for a collection of epiphyllums. 
John Sullivan, for begonia White Exquisite. 
John Sullivan, for a group of cyclamen at the Spring Show. 
John Sullivan, for stocks at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Floyd Wiley, for a terrarium and two foliage plants. 

Vote of Thanks 

American Airlines, for orchids at the Spring Show. 

John S. Ames, for pink camellias. 

Butterworth's, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 

Dr. Ernest N. Cory, for an exhibit of diseases of orchid plants at the Spring 

Show. 
Eastern Airlines, for orchids at the Spring Show. 
Miss F. Ethel Elliott, for saintpaulias. 
Miss F. Ethel Elliott, for a saintpaulia specimen. 
Miss F. Ethel Elliott, for a saintpaulia specimen. 

Florists' Telegraph Delivery Assoc, for a display of chrysanthemums. 
Mrs. Delia Haddad, for Epiphyllum ackermani. 
Charles R. Higbee, for a white pumpkin. 
Mrs. Dana Osgood, for a display of camellias. 
Pan American World Airways, for orchids at the Spring Show. 
Miss Eliza Philbrick, for a vase of mountain laurel. 
Miss Eliza Philbrick, for tree peonies. 
Miss Eliza Philbrick, for a vase of single roses. 
Miss Eliza Philbrick, for a vase of tulips. 

Mrs. Audrey Raphael, for orchid paintings in water color at the Spring Show. 
Trans World Airlines, for orchids at the Spring Show. 
United Airlines, for orchids at the Spring Show. 

Honorable Mention 

Dr. Mary Barry, for an exhibit of paintings at the Spring Show. 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of Conservation, for an exhibit 
of insect pest control at the Spring Show. 

41 




Photo: GENEREUX 



Chrysanthemum, Nightingale at the 1951 Chrysanthemum Show 



42 



Report of the Treasurer 

For the year ended December 31, 1951, your Society had a total income 
of $139,005.55. Expenditures amounted to $155,518.91. Thus, after the usual 
bookkeeping adjustments for income and expenses of restricted funds, there was 
a net operating deficit for the year of $16,617.18. This is the first deficit in my 
term of treasurership, and one of the few that have been reported over a long 
period of years. 

It is customary to discuss deficits with an air of pain and alarm. I can sum- 
mon neither of these emotions in reviewing the deficit your Society sustained, 
in 1951. In the first place, the Society remains in a strong financial position. 
In the second place, the results of our operations cannot be judged by the stand- 
ards of business enterprises. If they were to be so judged, we should soon lose 
sight of our true objectives. Our deficit needs no apology. It was sustained in 
the course of your Society's constant endeavor to promote a broader interest in 
horticultural activities. Our operating loss for 1951 may be traced primarily 
to considerably larger expenses in connection with our magazine "Horticul- 
ture". These heavier expenses were concerned mostly with our efforts to increase 
circulation. A large part of the money spent is likely to come back in the form 
of increased subscriptions and advertising, and I feel sure that the net result is 
likely to be a better magazine with a greater appeal to all gardeners. 

Moreover, like all other institutions whether they be colleges or hospitals 
or horticultural societies, our operating costs have tended to rise faster than our 
income. This trend was somewhat accentuated in 1951 by smaller receipts from 
the 1951 Spring Show than in the preceding year which had been unusually 
successful. 

I can make no hard and fast predictions for 1952; but on the basis of the ex- 
cellent financial results of the 1952 Spring Show I am confident that 1952 will 
prove to be a very satisfactory year and restore us to our usual black figures 
after our temporary experience with red ink. 

Stedman Buttrick 

Treasurer 

Report of the Treasurer 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AT DECEMBER 31, 1951 

Assets 

Cash In Banks And On Hand $ 43,795.37 

Accounts Receivable — "Horticulture" 4,788.82 

Accounts receivable $ 5,022.15 

Deduct: Estimated losses in collection . 233.33 

$ 4,788.82 

Accounts Receivable — Rent 717.00 

Bond Interest Receivable 1,175.00 

Investments Valued At Book Value . . . 806,663.55 

Capital Assets 596,041.38 

Real Estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and additions to building 50,896.28 

Library 46,580.47 

$596,041.38 
43 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

Deferred Charges $ 8,946.29 

Spring Show, 1952 $ 3,419.39 

Prepaid Insurance 2,547.80 

Plant Buyer's Guide inventory 2,327.20 

Almanac inventory 651.90 



$. 8,946.29 



$ 15,463.77 



$604,838.12 



$ 36,902.46 



$ 70,605.67 



,462,127.41 



Liabilities and Capital Funds 

Liabilities $ 15,463.77 

Accounts payable $ 13,888.86 

Taxes withheld 1,054.18 

Accrued commissions — Horticulture 444.25 

Social Security taxes accrued 76.48 



Deferred Income 446.39 

Sundry Funds 604,838.12 

Special Uses: Principal $167,920.73 

Unexpended Income 5,390.19 

$173,310.92 

General Uses: Principal 431,527.20 



Greater Endowment Fund 36,902.46 

Balance, January 1, 1951 $ 36,850.46 

Net addition — 1951 52.00 



Life Membership Fees 33,691.00 

Mt. Auburn Cemetery Fund 55,053.52 

Show Insurance Fund , . 53,177.93 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 70,605.67 

Balance, January 1, 1951 $ 70,493.17 

Add: Net gain on securities sold 112.50 



Surplus (Earned) 27,423.85 



$1,462,127.41 



44 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

Income 

1951 1950 

Income From Investments $ 54,230.80 $ 57,339.78 

Membership Fees (after member's subscription 

to Horticulture) 23,056.11 20,924.68 

Rentals. : 11,494.39 14,761.04 

Spring Show 64,507.70 82,332.69 

Autum Show 7,333.63 7,433.89 

"Horticulture" 78,292.46 5,766.38 

Garden Week 1,142.89 

Other Receipts 5,342.66 1,113.18 



$139,005.55 $171,013.99 

Expenditures 

Building Expense $ 34,521.56 $ 32,526.26 

Library Expense 16,716.99 16,035.46 

Office & General Salaries and Expenses 57,121.94 57,009.04 

Miscellaneous Exhibition Expense 3,662.55 3,588.47 

Awards, Lectures, Medals & Certificates 

Lectures paid from general funds 396.63 854.94 

Prizes, medals & certificates paid from general 

funds 3,523.52 3,686.10 

Prizes, medals & certificates paid from Spring 

\ Show 34,741.35 32,195.16 

Medals, lectures, etc. paid from restricted funds. . 1,801.80 1,866.99 

Awards at shows paid from restricted funds 3,032.57 2,881.84 



$155,518.91 $150, 644.26_ 

- <■& 

Net Income or Loss, All Funds 76,573.36 $ 20,369.73 

Elimination of Expenses included above paid from 

restricted funds: Income 6,613.02 6,653.14 



$ 9,900.34 $ 27,022.87 
Elimination of Income included above allocated to 

restricted funds . 6,716.84 6,716.84 



Net Income or Loss $ 76,677.78 $ 20,306.03 



Results of the Balloting 



At 4:00 o'clock the polls were closed, 83 votes having been cast, and the fol- 
lowing persons were declared elected: 
President: John S. Ames 
Vice-President: Oliver Wolcott 

Trustees: (For three years) Mr. Aubrey Butler, Mr. George Butterworth, 
Dr. George O. Clark, Mrs. James Perkins and Dr. R. A. Van Meter. 

45 



Books Added to the Library 

May 7, 1951 — May 7, 1952 

HORTICULTURE 

General 

Better Homes and Gardens. Garden Book. Des Moines, Iowa, 1951 

The Corpus Christi garden book. Corpus Christi, Texas, 1949 

Davis, B. A. Holland's handbook for southern gardeners. New York, 1951 

Everett, T. Gardening handbook. Greenwich, Conn., 1951 

Farrington, E. I. The gardener's almanac; 9th ed. rev., 1951 

Foret, J. A. (and others) Laboratory exercises in horticulture. Ames, Iowa, 1949 

Hartzog, M. A. Garden time in the South. Harrisburg, Pa., 1951 

Hottes, A. C. 1001 garden questions answered; 4th ed. New York, 1951 

Huber, W. So you're going to have a garden. Harrisburg, Pa., 1951 

Hudson, C. J., Jr. Hudson's garden scrapbook. Atlanta, Georgia, 1951 

Kelley, G. W. Rocky Mountain horticulture is different. Denver, Col., 1951 

Lamson, M. D. Garden housekeeping. New York, 1951 

LeCrone, F. An elementary course in general horticulture. Stillwater, Oklahoma, 

1951 
Manning, L. The how and why of better gardening. New York, 1951 
Miner, B. B. How to grow flowers, vegetables and fruit in your garden. New 

York, 1950 
Pirone, P. P. Modern gardening, a complete guide to the agricultural uses of mod- 
ern chemistry's miracle drugs. New York, 1952 
Ries, V. H. The gardener's troubleshooter. New York, 1952 
Seymour, E. L. D. The Wise garden encyclopedia. New York, 1951 
Throm, E. L. How to grow the best lawn and garden in your neighborhood. 

Chicago, 1951 
Youngman, W. H. The Star garden book, for Washington and nearby Maryland 
and Virginia. Washington, D. C, 195,1 

Propagation and pruning 

Grant, J. A. Pruning is simple. Seattle, Washington, 1948 
Hills, L. D. The propagation of alpine s. New York, 1950 
Isely, D. Seed analysis. Ames, Iowa, 1951 
Wittrock, G. L. The pruning book. Emmaus, Pa., 1948 

Horticultural history 
Fisher, R. A list of ornamental trees and shrubs noted in the writings of George 

Washington. Mount Vernon, Va., 1950 
Mackay, A. I. Farming and gardening in the Bible. Emmaus, Pa., 1951 
Taylor, G. M. British garden flowers. London, 1947 
Walker, Mrs. A. W. History of the Garden Club of South Carolina 1930-1950. 

Spartanburg, South Carolina, 1950 

AUXILIARY SCIENCES 

Soils 
Faulkner, E. H. Soil development. Norman, Oklahoma, 1951 
Hewitt, E. R. Good land from poor soil. Trenton, N. J., 1951 
Kelley, W. P. Alkali soils, their formation, properties and reclamation. New 
York, 1951 

46 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Molitor, C. S. Magic gardening for you (soilless culture) 3d ed. Coral Gables, 

Florida, 1951 
Russell, E. J. Soil conditions and plant growth; 8th ed. London, 1950 
Shields, E. B. Raising hybrid earthworms for profit. Chicago, 1951 

Diseases and pests 

Ahlgren, G. H. and Klingman, G. C. Principles of weed control. New York, 1951 

Brown, A. W. A. Insect control by chemicals. New York, 1951 

Engledow, R. A. The garden doctor. London, 1951 

King, F. C. The weed problem. London, 1951 

Kummer, A. P. Weed seedlings. Chicago, 1951 

Metcalf, C. L. and Flint, W. F. Destructive and useful insects; 3rd ed. New York, 

1951 
Pyenson, L. L. Elements of plant protection. New York, 1951 
Shepard, H. H. The chemistry and action of insecticides. New York, 1951 
Walker, J. C. Plant pathology. New York, 1950 

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 

General 

Ashberry, A. Miniature gardens. London, 1951 
Birdseye, C. and E. G. Growing woodland plants. New York, 1951 
Die Freiland-schmuckstauden; 2 and 4. Stuttgart, 1950-1951 

Hill, D., Nursery Co. Hill's illustrated evergreen brochure. Dundee, 111. 1949 
Hume, E. P. Some ornamental shrubs for the tropics. Washington, D. C, 1951 
Hume, E. P. Some ornamental vines for the tropics. Washington, D. C, 1949 
/Kobayashi, N. Bonsai — Miniature potted trees. Tokyo, 1950 
Perry, F. The garden pool. London, 1951 

Phillips, G. A. R. The rock garden and alpine plants; 2d ed. London, 1951 
Sanders, T. W. The flower garden; new ed. rev. by A. J. Macself. London, 1950 
Sunset Magazine. Sunset flower garden book; rev. and enl. San Francisco, 1951 

Greenhouse and house plants 

Chabot, E. How to grow rare greenhouse plants. New York, 1952 
Heinrich, J. J. The window flower garden; new and enl. ed. New York, 1905 
Preston, F. G. The greenhouse. Oxford, England, 1950 

Sunset Magazine. Sunset ideas for building plant shelters and garden work centers. 
Menlo Park, California, 1951 

Monographs 

American Rose Society. What every rose grower should know; 4th ed. Harris - 

burg, Pa. 1951 
American Orchid Society. Bulletin, 20th anniversary issue. New York, 1952 
Berry, G. H. Gentians in the garden. New York, 1951 
Biffen, R. H. The auricula: the story of a florist's flower. Cambridge, England 

1951 
Birdsey, M. R. The cultivated aroids. Berkeley, California, 1951 
Borg, J. Cacti; 2d ed.; a gardener's handbook. London, 1951 
Corliss, P. G. Hemerocallis, the perennial supreme. San Francisco, 1951 
Cornish, G. Your lawn. New York, 1951 

Crane, H. H. Pansies and violas for exhibition and garden. London, 1951 
Crook, H. C. Campanulas, their cultivation and classification. London, 1951 
Dittmer, H.J. Lawn problems of the Southwest. Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1950 

47 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Flynn, J. How to grow and keep a better lawn. New York, 1951 

Free, M. All about African violets. New York, 1951 

Graaff, J. de. The new book of lilies. New York, 1951 

Harvey-Cant, F. S. Rose selection and cultivation: fifty years with roses. London, 

1951 
Haworth-Booth, M. The hydrangeas. London, 1950 
Hertrich, W. Palms and cycads, their culture in southern California as observed 

chiefly in the Huntington Botanical Gardens. San Marino, California, 1951 
Jacobsen, H. and Volk, O. H. Mesembryanthemaceae (Mittagsblumengewachse) 

Stuttgart, 1950 
Jefferson-Brown, J. The daffodil. London, 1951 
Lamb, E. Cactus-like succulents. Worthing, England, 1950 
Lamb, E. Flowering your cacti. Worthing, England, 1948 
Mansfield, T. C. Carnations in colour and cultivation. London, 1951 
Nehrling, H. The amaryllis. Fair Oaks, California, 1951 
Oregon Orchid Society. Your first orchids and how to grow them. Portland, 

Oregon, 1951 
Rector, C. K. How to grow African violets. San Francisco, 1951 
Royal Horticultural Society. The lily year book. London, 1951-2 
Sanders. Sanders' complete orchid hybrids ... to Jan. 1, 1946. St. Albans, 

England, 1946 
Sanders. Addendum to Sanders' list of orchid hybrids, 1946, 1947, 1948. St. 

Albans, England, 1949 
Sanders. Popular orchid growing; American ed. St. Albans, England, 1951 
Schelle, E. Kakteen. Tubingen, Germany, 1926 
Sharp, M. L. and Collins, D. Roses illustrated and how to grow them. Portland, 

Oregon, 1951 
Southern California Camellia Society. The camellia, its culture and nomen- 
clature; 3d rev. ed. Pasadena, California, 1951 
Westcott, C. Anyone can grow roses. New York, 1952 
Wilson, H. V. P. The complete book of African violets. New York, 1951 
Wilson, H. V. P. Geraniums, pelargoniums, for windows and gardens; rev. ed. 

New York, 1950 
Wood, W. P. A fuchsia survey. New York, 1950 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND HERBS 

Barlow, R. O. Complete modern garden herbal; numerous facts about herb gar- 
dening and usage in several lands. Pennsylvania, 1945 
Childers, N. F. Vegetable gardening in the Tropics. Washington, D. C, 1950 
National Fertilizer Ass'n. The peanut, the unpredictable legume. Washington, 

D. C, 1951 
Royal Horticultural Society. The fruit year book, 1951-2. London, 1951 
Sievers, A. F. Production of drug and condiment plants. Washington, D. O, 1948 
Wilson, C. Empire in green and gold; the story of the American banana trade. 
New York, 1947 

AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY 

Castetter, E. F. and Bell, W. H. Yuman Indian agriculture. Albuquerque, 
New Mexico, 1951 

Fletcher, S. W Pennsylvania agriculture and country life, 1640-1840. Harris- 
burg, 1950 

Greeley, W. B. Forests and men. New York, 1951 

48 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Martin, J. H. and Leonard, W. H. Principles of field crop production. New 

York, 1949 
McCullough, J. C, Seed Co. Farm and grass seed manual. Cincinnati, 1950 
Smith, R. T. English husbandry. London, 1951 
Staten, H. W. and Jones, M. D. Farm crops, judging, identification and grading. 

New York, 1951 
Tyler, F. How to make a living in the country. New York, 1951 
Weiss, H. B. History of the New Jersey State Board of Agriculture, 1872-1916. 

Trenton, N. J., 1949 
Weiss, H. B. The New Jersey Dept. of Agriculture, 1916-1949. Trenton, N. J., 1950 

NATURAL HISTORY 

Andrews, R. C. Nature's ways: how nature takes care of its own. New York, 1951 
Klots, A. B. A field guide to the butterflies of North America east of the Great 

Plains. Boston, 1951 
Peterson, R. T. Wildlife in color. Boston, 1951 
Teale, E. W. North with the spring. New York, 1951 

Birds 
Chapman, F. M. Our winter birds, how to know and how to attract them. New 

York, 1918 
Hausman, L. A. Beginner's guide to attracting the birds. New York, 1951 
Hausman, L. A. Field book of eastern birds. New York, 1946 
Headstrom, R. Birds' nests of the West: a field guide. New York, 1951 
Lemmon, R. S. The birds are yours. New York, 1951 
Mason, C. R. Picture primer of attracting birds. Boston, 1952 
Reed, C. A. Bird guide: land birds east of the Rockies; completely rev. New 

York, 1951 
Saunders, A. A. A guide to bird songs. New York, 1951 

ECONOMICS AND CONSERVATION 

American Ass'n of School Administrators. Conservation education in American 

schools. Washington, D. C, 1951 
Andrews, E. H. The community industries of the Shakers. Albany, New York, 1 933 
Carhart, A. H. Water or your life. Philadelphia, 1951 

Florists' Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. F. T. D. A. fortieth anniversary. Chic, 1950 
Jenks, J. From the ground up. London, 1950 
Lies veld, J. H. The retail florist. New York, 1951 
Michigan State College, Dept. of Horticulture. Lectures presented at the national 

sales and management rally for florists. Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1951 
Palmer, E. L. Nature Magazine's guide to science teaching. Washington, D. C, 

1936 
Prentice, E. P. Hunger and history: the influence of hunger on human history. 

New York, 1939 
Seed Trade buyers guide, 1952. Chicago, 1952 
Thomsen, F. L. Agricultural marketing. New York, 1951 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Briggs, L. W. Charleston gardens. Columbia, South Carolina, 1951 

Collins, L., ed. Landscape architecture. Cambridge, Mass., 1951 

Godfrey, W. H. Gardens in the making. London, 1914 

Hussey, C. English country houses open to the public. New York, 1951 

Jones, H. S. and Seymour, E. L. D. Landscaping the small home. New York, 1951 

49 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Kocher, A. L. and Dearstyne, H. Colonial Williamsburg, its buildings and gardens. 

Williamsburg, Virginia, 1949 
National (Eng.) Gardens scheme. The gardens of England and Wales; general list. 

London, 1951 
Sitwell, G. On the making of gardens; new ed., introduction by Osbert Sitwell. 

London, 1909 

Plant materials 

Haworth-Booth, M. Effective flowering shrubs. London, 1951 

Stephens, T. My garden's choice of rock plants, trees and flowering shrubs and 
herbaceous plants. London, 1941 

Sunset Magazine. Sunset planting ideas for your northern California garden. 
San Francisco, 1951 

Sunset Magazine. Sunset planting ideas for your northwest garden. San Fran- 
cisco, 1951 

Sunset Magazine. Sunset planting ideas for your southern California garden. 
San Francisco, 1951 

Waugh, F. A. Outdoor theaters. Boston, 1917 

Wyman, D. Trees for American gardens. New York, 1951 

Garden furniture etc. 

Graffam, P. S., ed. Fences, gates, trellises and other garden items. Chicago, 1949 
Hawkins, R. R. and Abbe, C. H. Arbors and trellises — breezeways. New York, 

1951 
Hawkins, R. R. and Abbe, C. H. Garden pools, fountains, and recreation areas. 

New York, 1951 
Hawkins, R. R. and Abbe, C. H. Outdoor fireplaces . . . walls, terraces. New 

York, 1951 
Hawkins, R. R. and Abbe, C. H. Walks and paths — driveways, steps, curbs, and 

edgings. New York, 1951 
Scharff, R. Making terrace and outdoor furnishings. New York, 1951 
Sunset Magazine. How to build fences and gates. San Francisco, 1951 
Sunset Magazine. How to build walls, walks, patio floors. San Francisco, 1952 

BOTANY 

General 
Crane, M. B. and Lawrence, W. J. C. Genetics of garden plants; 4th ed. London, 

1952 
Dalitzsch. Pflanzenbuch; 4te aufl. Miinchen, 1905 
Hill, A. F. Economic botany; 2d ed. New York, 1952 
Leclerc du Sablon. Nos fleurs, plantes utiles et nuisibles. Paris, (18 . . .?) 
Moll, J. W. and Janssonius, H. H. Botanical pen-portraits. The Hague, 1923 
Muenscher, W. C. Poisonous plants of the United States; rev. ed. New York, 1951 
Robbins, W. W. and Weier, T. E. Botany: an introduction to plant science. New 

York, 1950 
Sinnott, E. W., Dunn, L. C. and Dobzhansky, T. Principles of genetics; 4th ed. 

New York, 1950 
Tehon, L. R. The drug plants of Illinois. Urbana, 1951 

Monographs 
Buxbaum, F. The morphology of cacti; part 1. Pasadena, 1950 
Christensen, C. M. The molds and man: an introduction to the fungi. Minneap- 
olis, 1951 

50 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Wolthuys, J. J. V. Enigma of the origin of monstrosity and cristation in succulent 
plants. Assen, Holland, 1948 

Floras — U. S. 

Abrams, L. Illustrated flora of the Pacific states: v. 3, Geraniaceae to Scrophulari- 

aceae, geraniums to figworts. Stanford, California, 1951 
Cormack, M. B. The first book of trees. New York, 1951 
Eliot, W. A. Forest trees of the Pacific coast. New York, 1938 
Graves, A. H. Illustrated guide to trees and shrubs. Wallingford, Connecticut, 1951 
Kieran, J. An introduction to wild flowers. Garden City, New York, 1952 
Little, E. L. Southwestern trees: a guide to the native species of New Mexico and 

Arizona. Washington, D. C, 1951 
Martin, A. C. and Zim, H. S. and Nelson, A. L. American wildlife and plants. 

New York, 1951 
McDougallj W. B. and Sperry, O. E. Plants of Big Bend National Park. Wash- 
ington, D. C, 1951 
Rogers, M. First book of tree identification. New York, 1951 

Floras — Other countries 
Bean, W. J. Trees and shrubs hardy in the British Isles; rev. ed. London, 1950- 

1951. 3 vols. 
Gilmour, J. Wild flowers of the chalk. London, 1947 
Pertchik, B. and H. Flowering trees of the Caribbean. New York, 1951 
Ross-Craig, S. Drawings of British plants, pt. V. London, 1951 
Woman's Club of Havana, Garden Section. Flowering plants from Cuban gar- 
dens. Havana, Cuba, 1952 

ESSAYS AND POETRY 

Arkell, R. Green fingers (poems). New York, 1952 

Burroughs, J. John Burroughs' America; selections from the writings . . . ed. by 

Farida A. Wiley. New York, 1951 
Fletcher, F. P. Hark! a song (poems). Boston, 1950 
Nichols, B. Merry Hall. London, 1951 

Porteous, A. Forest folklore, mythology and romance. London, 1928 
Sackville-West, V. M. In your garden. London, 1951 
ShurclifF, A. A. A man walks the earth: near and far in New England. Boston, 

1951 
Strong, P. The glory of the garden. New York, 1951 

Trimble, W. C. When kinfolks came (poems). Jackson, Mississippi, 1951 
Van Doren, D. The country wife. New York, 1950 
White, G. The natural history of Selbourne. London, 1924 

FINE ARTS 

Hunt, Mrs. R. A. Botanical books, prints and drawings from the collection of . . . 
Pittsburgh, 1952 

FLOWER ARRANGEMENT 

Atkinson, J. and R. Camellia magic. McComb, Mississippi, 1950 
Berrall, J. S. Flowers and table settings. New York, 1951 

Biddle, D. and Blom, D. New flower arrangements for everyone. New York, 1951 
Burke, E. Let's arrange roses. Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 1951 
Clarke, D. Simplified guide to flower arranging. New York, 1951 
Cyphers, E. H. Pleasures and problems in flower arrangement: a reference work 
for flower arrangers; 3d ed. Clifton, New Jersey, 1944 

51 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Flower Arrangers Club of Georgia. Artistry in arrangement. Hapeville, Georgia i 

1951 
Fort, M. J. Flower arrangements for all occasions. New York, 1952 
Gannon, R. Winter bouquets with color; 2d ed. New York, 1951 
Ishimoto, T. The art of driftwood and dried arrangements. New York, 1951 
Reusch, G. and Noble 5 M. Corsage craft. New York,^1951 
Roberts, P. E. Book of table arrangements. New York, 1951 
Spry, C. Summer and autumn flowers. New York, 1951 
Whitsitt, E. Roses and home flower arranging. New York, 1951 
Wright, J. Wedding book. New York, 1 947 

BIOGRAPHY 

Ewan, J. Rocky Mountain naturalists. Denver, 1950 

Hagberg, K. Carl Linnaeus. London, 1952 

Rodgers, A. D. Bernhard Eduard Fernow: a story of North American forestry. 

Princeton, 1951 
Stroud, D. Capability Brown. New York, 1951 
Weatherby, U. F. Charles Alfred Weatherby. Cambridge, Mass., 1951 

TRAVEL AND PLANT HUNTING 

Bates, M. Where winter never comes: a study of man and nature in the tropics. 

New York, 1952 
Butcher, D. Exploring the national parks of Canada. Washington, D. C, 1951 
Nuttall, T. Nuttall's travels into the old Northwest: an unpublished 1810 diary, 

ed. by Jeanette E. Graustein. Waltham, Mass., 1951 
Merrill, A. Our eastern playgrounds: a guide to the national and state parks and 

forests of our eastern seaboard. New York, 1950 
Tilden, F. The national parks, what they mean to you and me. New York, 1951 
Werdermann, E. Brazil and its columnar cacti. Pasadena, 1942 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Chilean Nitrate Educational Bureau, Inc. Bibliography of the literature on the 
minor elements and their relation to plant and animal nutrition; 4th ed., v. 2. 
New York, 1951 

Merrill, E. D. Index Rafinesquianus: the plant names published by C. S. Rafi- 
nesque with reductions and a consideration of his methods, objectives, and attain- 
ments. Jamaica Plain, Mass., 1949 

Soule, M. J., Jr. Bibliography of the mango. Coral Gables, Florida, 1950 

GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges 
with thanks gifts to the Library from the following donors: 
Batchelder, Mrs. C. F. 

My garden, 1951. 
Batchelder, Mrs. G. L., Jr. 

Essig, E. O. Insects of western North America. 

Gray's Structural and economic botany. 
Chilean Nitrate Educational Bureau, Inc. 

Bibliography of the literature on minor elements and their relation to plant life. 
Christian Science Publishing Company. 

Reynolds, G. W. The aloes of South America. 

Wood, W. P. A fuchsia survey. 

52 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Constitution and Free Enterprise Foundation. 

Prentice, E. P. Hunger and history: the influence of hunger on human history. 
Crosby, Mrs. S. V. R. 

Merrill, E. D. Index Rafinesquianus. 
Florist's Telegraph Delivery Ass'n. 

F. T. D. A. fortieth anniversary, 1950. 
Gannon, R. 

Gannon, R. Winter bouquets in color. 
Herb Society of America, New England Unit. In memory of Helen Noyes Webster. 

Key, E. Wild flowers of England. 
Hunt, Mrs. R. A. 

Hunt, Mrs. R. A. A catalogue of botanical books, prints and drawings from the 
collection of Mrs. R. A. Hunt. 
Loring, R. J. 

Boulanger, E. Distillerie agricole et industrielle. 

Durand, E. Manuel de viticulture pratique; 3e ed. 

Hedrick, U. P. Manual of American grape growing. 

Hoare, E. A practical treatise on the cultivation of the grape vine on open walls. 

Husman, G. American grape growing and wine making. 

Kaserer, H. (and others) Handbuch des Weinbaues; 2te aufl. 2 vols. 

Pacottet, P. Vinification ; 4e 6d. augm. 

Pacottet, P. Viticulture; 5e. 6d. 

Phin, J. Open air grape culture. 

Wortmann, J. (and others) Handbuch des Weinbaues und der Kellerwirtschaft; 
5te aufl. 
Mann, H. C. 

Gardner, F. D. Successful farming. 
Nehrling, A. H. 

Nehrling, H. The amaryllis. 

Die Frieland-Schmuckstauden: 2, 4. 

Jacobsen, H. and Volk, O. H. Mesembryanthemaceae. 

Michigan State College, Dept. of Horticulture. Lectures presented at the na- 
tional sales and management rally for florists. 
Slate, G. L. 

Smith, D., and Company. Catalogue of fruit trees. 
Thorp, Miss A. 

Copeland, Miss E. Portfolio of water colors of wild flowers. 
Walker, Mrs. R. D. 

Garden and forest. 1888-1897. 10 vols. 

Benson, A. History of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 1829-1929. 

Manning, R. editor. History of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 
1829-1878. 
Weatherby, Mrs. C. A. 

Wcatherby, U. F. Charles Alfred Weatherby. 
Wheeler, Mrs. R. 

Dalitzch. Pflanzenbuch; 4te aufl. 

Leclerc du Sablon. Nos fleurs, plantes utiles et nuisibles. 
White, Mrs. F. 

Palmer, E. L. Nature Magazine's guide to science teaching. 
Willard, S. E. >i 

The gardener's monthly, ed. by Thomas Meehan. v. 4, 5, 6. 

Lincoln, Mrs. A. H. Familiar lectures on botany; 16th ed. 

53 



Fruit and Flower Mission 

another year of service to our neighbors — in the larger sense — has passed 
f\ into the history of the FRUIT and FLOWER MISSION. Although we 
are now entering our eighty-third year as an organization devoted solely to 
humanitarian work, we are happy to report that instead of signs of senility, we 
are still "up and coming" and coming stronger every year. 

In order to reach the many people in the tenement districts that have devel- 
oped in recent years, we opened a new distributing center in another needy sec- 
tion of Roxbury, last Summer. This year another district will be brightened by 
our little messengers of cheer. This is in a section of Jamacia Plain that offers a 
decided contrast to that given over to beautiful estates and the Arnold Arbo- 
retum. To serve this large district, the Lexington Garden Club will send their 
generous donations there and the Garden Club of Holbrook has offered to make 
weekly shipments this summer. An entirely new community will be represented 
by Mrs. Ronald Hodder of the town of Sudbury. All these hampers of flowers 
and vegetables will be distributed to residents in the area covered by the Jamaica 
Plain Neighborhood House. To judge the value of our service — in any of the 
districts we serve — we need only quote from one of the reports given at the 
close of the hamper season. A little girl receiving a tiny boquet asked — "Is this 
really God's flowers, or did one of the teachers mal e them?" An elderly blind 
man in a Rest Home, gently fingering his bouquet, made the comment — "To- 
day we have velvet roses — they remind me of my happy boyhood when I lived 
in the country." 

Although our lists of lonely old people, in need of our mission of friendliness, 
have grown like Jack's beanstalk, we enlarged this phase of the work during the 
past year. We "adopted" a ward of about sixty-five women patients at the 
Boston State Hospital for mental cases. We visit them once a month, always 
bringing gifts of sweets or flowers and put on a simple entertainment in which 
we encourage the women to join. They now look forward to our coming and this 
normal, friendly contact with the world outside is of great value in the rehabili- 
tation of these unfortunates. The number of gift baskets sent out during the holi- 
days reached a new high this year. As the groups of volunteers work so hard 
preparing these beautiful and practical remembrances, the expression "a labor 
of love" is truly exemplified. From an elderly, cultured woman living on a pit- 
tance comes a little note in appreciation — "I say a little prayer of thanksgiving 
each time I open one of the little packages in the lovely basket." From another, 
"The love that goes into the preparation of all the food packages and the little 
gifts makes the whole day brighter — everything tastes so wonderful!" 

Those who are closest to our work never lose sight of the debt of gratitude we 
owe to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Through our contact with its 
members comes a great deal of our support. Sincere appreciation goes to all who 
have in any way had a share in helping us to lighten the burdends of so many 
of our fellow human beings. 

Ida A. Perkins 
Executive Secretary 

54 



Necrology 



Miss Caroline A. Abbot 
Mrs. Lyman Abbott 
Mrs. Charles H. Amhoff 
Miss Maud E. Appleton 
Mrs. Fred A. Arnold 
Mr. Ellis D. Atwood 
Mr. William G. Aurelio 
Mr. Francis Boylston Austin 
Mr. Ross W. Baker 
Mrs. George A. Bancroft 
Mrs. Walter H. Barber 
Dr. John W. Bartol 
Mrs. Bertha B. Bevrington 
Mr. Walter B. Binnian 
Mr. Patrick E. Broughall 
Miss Katherine E. Burke 
Mrs. Walter F. Canavan 
Bishop James E. Cassidy 
Mrs. Henry Helm Clayton 
Mr. John H. Clifford 
Mr. Sears B. Condit 
Mrs. C. O. Crawford 
Mrs. Gustave L. Daigneau 
Mrs. John Daland 
Mr. Joseph W. Devorss 
Mrs. Edwin Merrick Dodd 
Mr. James Donald 
Mr. Robert P. Eldridge 
Miss Olive H. Elliot 
Mr. William B. Esselen 
Miss Caroline H. Fabens 
Mr. Francis W. Forbes 
Mrs. Philip Gardner 
Mrs. Marie T. Garland 
Mr . Fred V. Gary 
Mr. Charles E. Gavitt 
Mr. George Gelineau 
Mrs. Charles T. Gifford 
Mrs. George L. Gilmore 
Mrs. William J. Goldthwait 



Mr. Charles E. Goodspeed 
Mr. Louis C. Grossmann 
Mrs. Edward R. Hale 
Miss Minna B. Hall 
Mr. B. Nason Hamlin 
Mrs. Violet E. Heath 
Mr. George Milbank Hersey 
Miss Laura G. Hills 
Mrs. Edward Hobart 
Mrs. James R. Hooper 
Mrs. Mark Hopkins 
Mrs. Ernest G. Howes 
Mrs. Helen Allen Hunt 
Mr. L. W. Jones 
Dr. Harris Kennedy 
Mr. Albert H. Kenney 
Mrs. Emma Mayer Keyes 
Mr. Hans J. Koehler 
Mr. Emory C. Lakeman 
Mrs. Horatio A. Lamb 
Mrs. John G. Lewis 
Mrs. Arthur Lyman 
Miss Elsie M. Mackenzie 
Mr. Dodge Macknight 
Mr. Reginald H. Mair 
Mrs. Ida Mansfield 
Mrs. Ellen L. Mason 
Mr. Frank S. Mason 
Mrs. Aaron L. Mcdonald 
Miss Jessie C. Mcphee 
Mrs. Mary A. Melcher 
Miss Mildred A. Miller 
Miss Edith Olsen 
Miss Annie E. Packard 
Mr. Augustin H. Parker 
Mr. Samuel C. Payson 
Mr. E. Allan Peirce 
Mr. Charles J. Peterson 
Dr. Hardy Phippen 
Mrs. Harold A. Pitman 



Ezekiel Pratt, M. D. 

Mrs. Herbert G. Pratt 

Mr. Elwyn G. Preston 

Mr. Robert Pyle 

Mr. John W. Queen 

Mr. William K. Richardson 

Mr. Homer D. Ricker 

Mr. James L. Russell 

Mrs. William F. Ryan 

Mr. Charles W. Ryder 

Mr. Herbert E. Seidel 

Dr. Charles E. Shawen 

Mrs. John W. Sheperdson 

Mrs. William J. Skinner 

Dr. Frank Whipple Snow 

Mrs. Louis Spear 

Mrs. John C. Stilwell 

Mr. J. Winthrop Stone 

Mr. Richard Clipston Sturgis 

Miss May A. Sumner 

Mrs. Josephine Talbot 

Mr. Daniel G. Tenney 

Mr. George C. Thurlow 

Mrs. Gertrude I. Titus 

Mr. James V. Toner 

Mrs. Wallace C. Tucker 

Mr. Horace F. Turner 

Mrs. John F. Tyler 

Mr. Charles C. Walker 

Miss Mary Walsh 

Mr. John W. Warner 

Mrs. George H. Warren 

Mr. P. H. Wessels 

Mr. Alain White 

Mrs. Helen G. Whittle 

Mr. Edwin M. Wilder 

Miss Edna C. William 

Mrs. William E. Wing 

Mrs. William H. Young 



55 



Honorary Members 



1942 Lord Aberconway, North Wales, England 

1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Walter D. Brownell, Little Gompton, Rhode Island 

1942 Dr. William A. Dayton, Washington, D. G. 

1942 David Fairchild, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Joseph B. Gable, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Henry Hicks, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1 942 Colonel R. H. Montgomery, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1 942 Robert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1 942 Frederick Law Olmstead, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1 942 Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson, New York, New York 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Dr. A. B. Stout, New York, New York 

1 942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1 942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1 942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1942 Elizabeth C. White, Whitesbog, New Jersey 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
1943 Vincent DePetris, Grosse Farms, Michigan 

1943 Edward I. Farrington, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 

1944 E. O. Orpet, Santa Barbara, California 

1 944 Wilfrid Wheeler, Hatchville, Falmouth, Massachusetts 

1 944 Richardson Wright, New York, New York 
1 945 Joseph H. Hill, Richmond, Indiana 

1 945 Albert Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1945 Jacob K. Shaw, Amherst, Massachusetts 

1946 Walter B. Clarke, San Jose, California 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Brien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

1947 Dr. A. F. Blakeslee, Northampton, Massachusetts 

1947 Thomas H. Everett, New York Botanical Garden, New York 

1 947 James J. Hurley, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

1 947 Dr. Elmer Drew Merrill, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

1947 Isabella Preston, Lancaster, England 

1 948 Ernest Borowski, Norwood, Massachusetts 
1948 Stedman Buttrick, Concord, Massachusetts 
1948 Ernest F. Coe, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1 948 John L. Russell, Dedham, Massachusetts 

1 948 Eric Walther, San Francisco, California 

1949 Morris Carter, Boston, Massachusetts 
1949 Henry Kohankie, Painesville, Ohio 

1949 A. Kenneth Simpson, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

1949 Harold B. Tukey, East Lansing, Michigan 

1950 Montague Free, New York, New York 

1 950 Dr. Wilson Popenoe, Tegucigalpa, Honduras 

1 950 Kenneth Post, Ithaca, New York 

1950 George L. Slate, Geneva, New York 

1951 William Hertrich, San Marino, California 
1951 Dr. Samuel L. Emsweller, Beltsville, Maryland 
1951 Jan de Graaff, Gresham, Oregon 

1951 Thomas C. Desmond, Newburgh, New York 

1951 Mary May Binney, Milton, Mass. 

1 952 Sir William Wright Smith, Edinburg, Scotland 

1952 Dr. Walter E. Lammerts, La Canada, California 
1 952 Prof. Alex Laurie, Columbus, Ohio 

1952 Dr. Donald Forsha Jones, New Haven, Conn. 

1952 Mrs. Beatrix Farrand, Bar Harbor, Maine 

56 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 

FOR more than a century the Massachusetts Horticultural Society has 
been favored by the generosity of its members whose patronage has 
made possible an Endowment Fund for carrying on its multitudinous ac- 
tivities for the promotion of horticulture in this commonwealth. Further- 
more, the Society has contributed greatly to the ever increasing develop- 
ment of horticultural influence and achievement throughout the country. 
It is hoped that the Massachusetts Horticultural Society will be remem- 
bered by those members who wish to distribute their funds for public 
benefaction in the fields of the arts and sciences. All bequests are tax- 
exempt. This Society enjoys an enviable reputation for its solid financial 
condition and its judicious method of handling investments. Since expenses 
for maintenance and activities are ever on the increase, additional funds 
are needed to carry on and to extend the services of this Society — "for 
the advancement of horticulture." 



Form of Bequest 

I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, 

the sum of to be used as the Board 

of Trustees may direct for the promotion of horti- 
culture in its various forms and for extending the 
activities of the Society along educational lines. 

Signed 



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